Why Was Andrew Jackson A Good President?

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Was Andrew Jackson a “good” president? The presidency of Andrew Jackson has sparked controversy as to whether or not he really was the patriotic war-hero many have made him out to be. Despite the speculation of Jackson’s success as president, it can be agreed upon that Andrew Jackson made great strides for the United States during his imperfect presidency. Andrew Jackson accomplished much during the two terms he served as president. One notable feat of Jackson was that he was able to pay off the entirety of the national debt shortly after being elected. Before being elected, Jackson worked as a land speculator in Tennessee and, through work, developed a steady hatred for debt, paper money, and banks. He carried this hatred with him into …show more content…
This was contrasting of any other president that had come before Jackson, as those who preceded Jackson were among the cohort of wealthy, educated, upper-class citizens. Andrew Jackson was a “self-made” (who was not formally educated) man that appealed to the large amount of working-class people in the Union. His appeal to the people of the United States was displayed not only through his election, but through a ravenous after-party that took place on the lawn of the White House. It was reported that after the election, a “mob” of American people rushed to the White House to celebrate, later having to be escorted out because the party had grown “out-of-hand”. Jackson’s belief that he was representative of “the common man” was just one way he shaped the role of …show more content…
Many speculators have criticized Jackson’s use of executive authority through either vetoing bills he saw as “bad policy”, dealing with the Nullification Crisis, or the Indian Removal Act However, if it were not for Jackson’s firm decisiveness and lack of fear in expanding the duties of the president, the United States would have been much different today. Not only was Jackson able to delay the onset of war, but he laid down the foundation of modern-day democracy through the concept of Jacksonian Democracy. Andrew Jackson did what he thought was “best” for the people of the United States, which, more often than not, required affirmative, executive

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