Differences During The Cold War And The United States

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The Cold War lasted nearly 45 years because neither the United States nor the Soviet Union wanted to compromise their political or religious ideals. Both nations considered their way of thinking to be the best, and the looming threat of nuclear warfare further escalated the tension. A stalemate resulted from the countries’ inability to address their differences, especially those on politics, economics, and religion. When the United States and the Soviet Union began to address their differences, both had seen significant increases in arms productions and were facing their fears that the Cold War might turn hot. The United States held that democracy was the best government for all people. Because the Soviet Union ran under a totalitarian regime, …show more content…
After China obtained a new government, the United States refused to recognize the communist party, headed by Mao Zedong (Foner 888). Shortly after, the National Security Council (NSC) met and decided to pursue a “global crusade against communism” (Foner 888). The council proposed a plan to dramatically increase military spending: “In the broadest terms, the ability to perform these tasks requires a build-up of military strength by the United States and its allies…” (RAP 220). The NSC’s goal then was to produce more weapons than the Soviet Union in order to properly defend itself and its …show more content…
The United States wished to prevent the spread of communism and instead promote democracy and capitalism. Both countries increased production of arms, both nuclear and not, in order to stave off a possible invasion. Tensions between the two countries showed no signs of dissolving until Nixon introduced an idea of “peaceful coexistence” with the Soviet Union (Foner 1012). Détente, a softening of relations, would “replace the hostility of the Cold War” (Foner 1012). Both countries felt that their ideals were best, and Nixon saw that reworking relations was the only way to prevent an active war from breaking out. A result of Nixon’s new policy were the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaties (SALT). The treaties ceased the production of weapons and aimed to shrink each countries’ vast collection of nuclear missiles (Foner 1011). For the first time, the United States and Soviet Union worked to diffuse the possibility of an all-out war instead of preparing to retaliate if the other attacked

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