Theories Of Eric Erikson's Four Stages Of Development

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Learning theories are the foundation to understanding the human development from birth to adulthood. Many theorist have provided teachers and parents, information on understanding children 's social learning , cognitive learning, and their behavioral learning. For early childhood teachers, it is important for them to know how children develop and learn. Teachers need to know how children develop that way they can understand the children 's learning style, how to plan there curriculum, and there classroom setting. Each child is different and their needs may vary, so as a teacher, having resources such as these different theories, are to help create the environment that each child needs to be successful. Since there are a variety of …show more content…
His first stage is trust versus mistrust, which is birth to 1 year. This stage explains the importance of babies gaining trust for the caregivers, parents, other people around them. Providing affection, emotional security, and physical needs (Gordon & Browne, 2010 p.10), will naturally give trust for the child. Inconsistency and inadequate care will develop mistrust for the child, which then will make it harder for the child to trust people around them . As an early childhood teacher who is working with infants and toddlers, need to be aware of each child , and provide attention for emotional and physical needs, a warming and calm environment, and also a safe environment. Babies cannot cope with there own discomfort and stress so they become reliable on the adult taking care of them to help gain trust in their environment so they can grow and move on to the next stage Erik Erikson …show more content…
There are 4 stages to his theory of mental development, but the second stage is most connected to early childhood teachers. The article, Jean Piaget Biography, says: pre-occupation stage is ages 3-7 years old, and that a child develops intelligence through symbolic , fantasy play, and natural intuition. His theory relies both on maturational and environmental factors. The example the Gordon and Browne , 2010, gives is that learning is heredity which is how the body is structured biologically, and environmental learning because the expectations children have will directly influence how they

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