Piaget Theory Of Cognitive Development Essay

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The thinking patterns of a three-year-old preschooler vary drastically from the thinking patterns of a nine-year-old student. This comes to no surprise if you follow Piaget’s stages of cognitive thinking, it becomes obvious as to why there would be such an apparent difference between the two thinking styles.
What is Piaget’s theory of cognitive development? Well, Piaget believed, based on observations that children tend to form mental concepts, or schemes, as they experience new situations. Piaget also believed that children then tried to understand the unknown in a process known as assimilation. In this process, a child will try to understand new things in terms of schemes they already understand. However, when doing this a child might be wrong. If the child is corrected, he or she will alter his or her old schemes to fit new information in a process known as accommodation. Lastly, Piaget proposed that there are four distinct stages of development.
In differentiating the children using Piaget’s theory of cognitive
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The children become able to think about all the relevant features of any given object, because centration no longer occurs. Not only that, but they begin to think more logically about beliefs (like Santa Claus), hey ask questions, and come to much more rational conclusions about the fantasies of their early childhood. In this stage, they begin to dabble in science and math and are convinced they know more than their parents. However, like before, they have some limitations.
The most major limitation in concrete operations is the inability to deal with abstract concepts. Abstract concepts like freedom, people can define it; they can get a good sense of what it means, but there is nothing they can point to and say, “this is freedom." They are more comfortable with concrete objects, things they can hold, touch, or at least picture in their

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