The Tragic Hero In Antigone And Oedipus The King

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In life, “we [can] do everything right, act on the best information available, and with the best of intentions, yet still commit unspeakable horrors” (“The Tragic Hero in Greek Drama”). Aristotle created a definition of a tragic hero based on Sophocles’ characters in the tragedies Antigone and Oedipus the King. His definition, known as the Aristotelian tragic hero, has specific requirements the character must possess. Creon is the character that best exemplifies Aristotle’s tragic hero because of his virtue, his hubris, and his realization of his fate; however, others may argue that Antigone is a better example of a tragic hero because of her virtue and her hamartia, but in fact, Creon displays more qualities of a tragic hero Aristotle has …show more content…
In Oedipus the King, Oedipus, thinking that Creon wanted to take the throne away from him, accuses Creon of murdering King Laius. Despite the inaccuracy of the accusation, Creon calmly states, “[n]ever—curse me, let me die and be damned if I’ve done you any wrong you charge me with” (Sophocles, Oedipus the King 196). Creon expresses that he has the same amount of power as Oedipus, and he does not want the responsibility of being king. This shows that Creon was originally a good person because he logically responded to Oedipus’ harsh accusations. Then, when Oedipus blinds himself, Creon is forced to take power. At the beginning of Antigone, he is an admirably strong and powerful leader because he makes laws that are in the best interest of his city; however, he becomes obsessed with the control of his city. His hubris, or excessive pride, eventually catches up with …show more content…
Others may believe Antigone is a better example of a tragic hero because of her virtue and her hamartia; however, Creon portrays more Aristotelian qualities than Antigone. Creon is originally a good and admirable character, but due to his excessive pride and obsession with control, he loses his family. He comes to a realization that his decision of exiling Antigone led to his tragic fate. While Antigone is admirable and makes a fatal decision, she never has an epiphany where she realizes her own decision caused her downfall. Although Creon acted with the best intentions and tried to do the right thing, his actions resulted in horrible misery and regret for

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