The Supreme Court Case: The John Marshall Case

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President John Adams appointed William Marbury an office and his commission was to be present by Chief Justice James Madison; however, Madison refused to present the commission. (Ginsbert et al, 2013). Therefore, in 1803 Marbury made an appealed to the Supreme Court to have his commission honored. The following President Thomas Jefferson did not believe that the Supreme Court could intervene and that the commission should not be granted. Chief Justice John Marshall had three questions in regards to the appeal (McBride, 2006). Did Marbury have a right to petition the court, did the law of the land have the right to make a decision, and finely did Supreme Court have that right to make the decision (McBride, 2006)? It was decide that

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