Rene Descartes Meditation First On Philosophy Analysis

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Even though the Meditations First on Philosophy was published in 1641 by René Descartes, he started working on this book in 1639, as revolution of sorts that ended with the Prince of Orange intervening on René’s behalf. This “controversy led Descartes to post two open letters against his enemies” that got him to involve a Prince and Princess, and charges where raised that “stemmed from various misunderstandings about his method and the supposed opposition of his theses to Aristotle,” the things of politics concerning the city, “and the Christian faith”, being the largest religious community at that time (Skirry 1). As a result, The Council of Utrecht called upon him and threaten to burn is writings and the expulsion of René from the Dutch Province …show more content…
Descartes even states it, “I am conscious that I exist …. Is not dependent on things, the existence of which is as yet unknown to me” (Descartes 106). This false cause is mentioned by the secondary author, “Even Descartes recognized the need to acknowledge the close, intimate relationship between mind and body” (Chaffee 108). This consciousness is dependent on the natural causes of development in the world of physical and natural laws not some supernatural force that substances its essence that is isolated and alone. Second is that the consciousness is also affected by internal things of desire and despair. This concludes that the mind can adapt or evolve that through the current present this change can occur with different stimuli. Although the argument for exists is still questionable there is a lot more direct evidence to prove through naturalism that the existence of the self has a reasoning thinking thing that is conditional to the universe and its laws. Now also mentioning the fact that there can be internal constraints, as well that effect and can cause continual effects, which directly affects the self. This point was first documented by, Mortiz Schlick a Philosopher who wrote “When Is a Man Responsible” according the secondary author Schlick mentions the constraints of “mental illness and neuroses” are causes that effect or constraint the minds “functions and natural tendencies” (Chaffee 180). This of course could not be assumed at the time yet Descartes still believed that the mind receded in the brain. So it concludes that even though the self does exist, as an apparent abstract idea of the mind through rational facilities, the certainty of the self depends on influences of outside experience and limitations and how the

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