Skinner's Theory Of Mind-Body Dualism

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In philosophy, a theory that includes the viewing of the the mind and body as being separate kinds of substances or natures is known as mind- body dualism. This stance implies that the mind and body not only differ in meaning but refer to different kinds of entities. Thus, a person that proposes the concept of dualism would oppose any theory that identifies mind with the brain, conceived as a physical operant. Descartes reaches this conclusion by arguing that the nature of the mind is completely and utterly distinct from that of the body, and therefore it is possible for one to exist without the other. This argument gives rise to the famous problem of mind-body causal interaction that are still commonly debated today: how can the mind cause …show more content…
The innovation of modern day behavioralism started as a movement brought back to the methodological proposals of John B. Watson, who named the term. According to B.F. Skinner, a critically acclaimed psychologist, behaviorism is the philosophy behind the science of behavior. Skinner was mainly known for defining radical behaviorism, a philosophy that embodied the basis of his school of research, named the EAB. While EAB (Experimental analysis for behaviorism) differs from other subtle approaches to behavioral research on countless theoretical points, radical behaviorism takes a departure from methodological behaviorism most poignantly in accepting feelings as well as states of mind as existent and scientifically feasible. This is done by classifying them as something non-dualistic, and here Skinner takes a divide-and-conquer approach, with some instances being identified with bodily conditions or behavior, and others getting a more extended "analysis" in terms of …show more content…
However, Just because Descartes is able to think of his mind having life without his body, this doesn’t actually mean that his mind can really exist without his body. Maybe more research will show that there is some metaphysical connection between his mind and body that would make this impossible that Descartes doesn’t know about. Nevertheless, There are two complications facing Descartes’ arguments against mind- body dualism. The first relates to claims about whether one particular thing is or is not the same thing as another, or whether they are different. A second difficulty goes with this one hand and hand. Descartes is used his ability to think to ponder the possibilities. If the mind is indeed affiliated with the functioning of the body, then it is plausible for the mind to exist without the body. So to be able to know what is possible here, we first need some self- inflicted excuse to think that the mind is something totally from the body, such as the argument from indivisibility. Even at that point in our reasoning, it’s extremely important that we are still cautious, thus using what we can conceive of as a test of

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