Physical Geography Chapter Summary

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In the novel, The Power of Place: Geography, Destiny, and Globalization’s Rough Landscape, the author, Harm De Blij, writes about the topic of the impact of physical geography and development. The physical geography is the study of natural features and how we deal with them. Physical geography does not just determine why people can live in certain places or not. Physical geography also influences people’s lifestyles and how they adapt to the food sources and climate. For instance, De Blij states, “Tens of millions of habitants of isolated mountain valleys...are as bound to their isolated abodes as their forebears were” (pg. 3). De Blij is saying that the impact of the physical geography has confined the inhabitants of the mountain valleys. …show more content…
Health is a matter of the natural environment, cultural customs, genetic predisposition, and other elements. Usually, the poorest and weakest countries are also the most sickest. These countries are the sickest since they are not as modern and health literate as the richest and strongest countries around the world. One of the diseases that the author mentions is malaria. Malaria affects about 300 million people yearly, and over 1 million people, predominantly children, die every year. “The rich and medically capable countries of the core never sustained a coordinated campaign to defeat (or at least contain) malaria” (De Blij, 2009, pg.81). However, the medical research that was done in the United States and other places did produce treatments for people who suffer from HIV/AIDS. Malaria affects everyone around the world, but the people who suffer the most from malaria are usually from tropical Africa, South and Southeast Asia, and equatorial areas elsewhere. The survivors of malaria develop a grade of immunity to the disease, but it is often incapacitated. One of the treatments of malaria was the drug, chloroquine. Chloroquine helped reduced the effects of malaria greatly during the 1950s and the 1960s. However, the drug did work for quite a time, but the parasites developed an immunity to chloroquine. In the United States the invention of window screens and air conditioning helped with the malaria …show more content…
93). Water something that you would think is clean, safe, and able to drink without the fear of becoming sick. However, water is not that thing, and it will never be that. Schistosomiasis is a disease that is transmitted by freshwater snails. This snail then sends infected larva into slow-moving or still water, and then enters the body through the skin or body openings when people bathe or work in the water. Once they get inside the body, they grow and develop into mature worms, and they affect the liver, kidneys, bladder, and other organs. Eventually, all the damage that they do on your organs will cause internal bleeding and skin rashes. It stuns the growth in children, and in adults causes malnourishment. De Blij states, “... schistosomiasis is second only to malaria as humanity’s most serious infectious disease…” (pg. 94). Luckily, schistosomiasis is confined mostly confined to Africa, South America, East Asia, and a small portion of Japan, and estimates show that more than 200 million people are affected with schistosomiasis in the global periphery. In Japan improved sanitation conditions and in Africa, a drug, praziquantel, has helped lessen the people that become infected with schistosomiasis. In summary, all it takes is a drink of water, or a swim, bath, or just

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