Forced Motherhood Case Study

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Introduction
The Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey case, resulted in women’s basic liberties being overtaken by the state’s interests. As a result, states can continue to restrict a women from having an abortion after their interpretation of when fetal viability occurs. The court’s ruling ultimately is unconstitutional, as the basic reproductive rights have been taken away from women. The state’s interest in the development of unborn fetuses, along with their interpretations of when viability occurs, ultimately infringes upon women’s liberties that are granted by the fourteenth amendment. Therefore, it is imperative that states eradicate any restrictions preventing women from being the sole determinate in the outcome of their unborn fetus(s) until after its birth.
Effects of Forced Motherhood
The mother-child relationship (PCR) is indispensable to the development of children. However, unwanted childbearing is a complex issue and poses a great threat to the relationship — as it includes psychological,
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In the 1973 ruling in Roe v. Wade, courts ruled that state laws limiting abortion to rape and life threatening complications, was unconstitutional and violated women’s liberties. However, states were allowed to restrict abortions once the fetus reached the point of viability. This decision was justified based on idea that states were preserving the life of an unborn child, which led fetal rights. Currently, many states have the right to enact laws to amend homicide statutes to include fetuses, define fetus as human being; and permit civil law suits for causing harm to a fetus (LSRJ, 2009). Many argue that these rights infringe on the liberties of women. However, despite objections, states recognize fetal rights, because it is the child’s “legal right to begin life with a sound mind and body” (UA,

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