1.1 Explain How Child-Centred And Adult-Led Practice Analysis

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Observing a child is a good way to start planning supportive play, learning and development for children. “It is important to work closely with parents and carers so that these needs can be met within the early years setting” ( C Meggitt, T Bruce, page 257, 2015) In setting the practitioner will watch the child and write down what the child is doing if they think it is relevant to their development. Asking the parents and carers to do the same job and watch the child develop new skills and see what they can and can’t do will also help the practitioner as the child could be doing something at home that they do not do in setting and that could be evidence that they are developing as they should be. Doing this so the child doesn’t know you are …show more content…
Child-centred practise will give the practitioner an idea of what the child is interested in playing with and what they tend to avoid doing when playing. Child- centred practise could also show the practitioners what they child is capable of. This could then lead to the structure of the adult- ked practise. Adult- led practise must be a planned session for the child. They will then follow this ‘plan’ and the child will then potentially show they practitioner that they can do the task given or not do the task. Both adult and child led play help the practitioner understand more about the child and give them an opportunity to structure a plan to support the child’s development and learning …show more content…
This is so that the practitioner can find the information needed to start supporting the child’s play, learning and development. This information could contain what the child routine is at home, what they usually play with, what the parent feels their child needs to improve on, etc. This information will be important when observing the child. Getting children to learn new skills is hard when there is now communication. If the practitioner is working on counting skills with the child in setting but the parents/carers are not doing it at home the child will find it difficult to learn these skills. “Early year’s practitioners can encourage this by making sure that parents and carers are fully aware of what is happening in the setting, and by asking for feedback” ( C Meggitt, T Bruce, page 491, 2015) Asking for feedback from the parents lets the practitioner know how the child gets on at how doing the tasks set. Working partnerships that support the child are also essential as they will be able to give the practitioner a better understanding of the child’s needs and what their role is to support the child with all the help they need. This information would be useful in understanding the child’s background, circumstances and any other issues that have happened in the child’s private life. This information would be filled away and only used if in need of informing another

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