The Importance Of Learning In An Inclusive Classroom

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When the individual with disabilities education act was passed, the idea of an inclusive classroom became a prevalent idea in schools. Yet, many people still question if this is a positive or negative addition to the school system. What you will find is that inclusive classroom model is not only workable but will promote life skills that could be extremely helpful. In “Learning in an Inclusive community” Sapon-Shevin argues inclusive classrooms is the best way to teach students how to treat each other, while also promoting a positive environment for students to learn about others differences which include: class, gender, ethnicity, family background, sexual orientation, language, abilities, size, religion and more. (Sapon-Shevin’s, 190) Other …show more content…
These classrooms allow students a variety of opportunities that are not present in the normal classrooms. The first is allowing students and teachers to engage is very in-depth and complex discussions over topics that aren’t covered in the regular curriculum. The inclusive classroom isn’t just about students with disabilities, but also students of diversity. Some of the most prominent topics to discuss about our society today, are ethnicity, disabilities, gender, and family background. (Sapon-Shevin’s, 189) When exposing children to this kind of extensive diversity, you are helping them to achieve the necessary skills needed in our democratic society. Another way inclusive classroom can be useful is in advancing student’s ability on how to interact with students that are different from them. This is essential because often times as an adult we get nervous and shy away from situations with people with disability or of diverse cultures due to the lack of experience. (Sapon-Shevin’s, 189) The second reason inclusive classrooms could be beneficial would be that it fosters a positive helping environment. “Inclusive settings provide multiple opportunities to explore what it means to help one another. By challenging the notion that there are two kinds of people- those who help and those who give help- we teach all students to be both givers and receivers” (Sapon-Shevin’s, 191) When implementing …show more content…
That main argument is that this model will eliminate tracking in classrooms. (Carpenter, 193) Tracking is essentially placing students in classes that reflect their academic ability. And by implementing inclusive classrooms, tracking can no longer be used. Carpenter fears that by carrying out this model, students with disabilities will not have the opportunity to obtain a quality of education. There are a few things discussed in Sapon-Shevin article that would make sure that this does not happen. Teachers may use differentiated instruction, placing students in specific classes is not needed. “Differentiated instruction can mean allowing a non-reader to listen to a book on tape” (Sapon-Shevin, 189) they may also use positive behavioral management to help with classroom management. “But it can also mean ongoing community building, classroom meetings, cooperative games, and a culture of appreciation and celebration for all students.” (Sapon-Shevin, 189) The second argument is that children don’t need to experience diversity and inclusion to fully understand the concept. Sapon-Shevin counteracts that argument by saying “The only way to gain full fluency, comfort, and ease is through genuine relationships in which we learn how to talk to and about people whom we perceive as different” (Sapon-Shevin, 189) Learning is very different from living these experiences and interactions with students who are

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