Data Collection In Qualitative Research

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Costley et al. (2010) suggest that the selected strategies for gathering information and data from the field ought to be methodologically logical, for all intents and purposes and morally attainable, and fit for giving the kind of data required by the researcher. This is vital since it ensures that the data collected by the researcher is evaluated for the extent of information needed and their depth. Nonetheless, in data collection, there is evidence that the expense of the strategy, the precision of the information and the effectiveness of the information that is gathered, (SOURCE).
To collect data, the researcher used a qualitative approach. This method seeks to obtain a response to the question being researched upon, (Aveyard, 2014). It has been noted that qualitative studies provide researchers with the perceptions and experiences of both nursing staff and dual diagnosis service users in minimising violent and aggressive behaviour, (Polit and Beck, 2014). Therefore, the aim and objective of the research are achieved
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This is evident by the manner in which researchers persuade participants to develop their responses leading to new themes not initially thought of emerging (SOURCE). Another advantage identified is the avoidance of prejudgements by researchers as evidenced in their attempts to clarify why a given outcome was provided, (SOURCE). Moreover, Saks and Allsop (2013) maintain that it offers in-depth information to both researchers and participants of the study. This is evidenced by the process and in the depth of analysing data by documenting on the behaviours, attitudes, and feelings of the study’s participants. Lastly, it replicates a person’s experiences as noted through the interview process. This permits individuals to offer an insight into why they operate in a given fashion including their feelings and emotions regarding their

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