The God You Thought You Knew Chapter Analysis

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The God You Thought You Knew: Exposing the 10 Biggest Myths about Christianity, by Alex McFarland, argue ten shared misconceptions or myth s about God and Christianity. The writer believes that there are truths that disprove those myths. America almost certainly has more printed Bibles per person, than any other people group in the world. God is a topic that people seem to know everything about, beside what they care to identify with. However, they just do not feel they need to evaluate their own lives. We should be the influence challenging the thoughts people have about God. The author takes each of the myths that people consider about God, and obliterates them with the Truth of God's Word. Every myth is substituted with the Truth of the Gospel. McFarland deals with challenging themes like the apparent intolerance of Christianity, to the hypothetical or imaginary dismissing of Faith through science.

We need to be position or direct the world to the Truth of God. Living the life of a Christian can be difficult. But, there are times
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He starts each chapter with the myth, continuing with Truth as instructed within Scripture or in history, depending on the myth. McFarland deals with myths like: bigoted and unloving Christianity, it has been disproved by science, Christianity is not a belief for the intelligent, and it is not true because it has not worked for me. The writer clarifies that there is a difference between the God we identify with and the God of the Bible. He says that we have been misinformed or taught only half the truth. There have been many misleading teaching through the centuries. Unless the Truth of the Bible is read and learned for yourself, people could be misled.
Here are three examples of those misconceptions: Christianity is bigoted and critical toward others... “A lot of people think that, largely because of the four and a half decades of the homosexual agenda being promoted in our

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