Divine Command Theory: The Euthypro Problem

Decent Essays
This paper will talk about a theory known as Divine Command and the problem that hampers it which is known as the Euthypro Problem. To start off the paper, I will explain what the Divine Command Theory is and the main idea behind it. Next, I will talk about why this theory is so enticing to many people. After, I will reveal the problem with the theory called the Euthypro Problem, why it is titled Euthypro, and why it causes a problem within the theory. Later in the paper, I will discuss how the first part of the theory makes morality trivial and how it makes the concept of God always being good unimportant. Then, I will disclose that the second part of the theory leads to these specific problems disappearing. To finish off the paper, I will …show more content…
The main idea of it is based on what God has ordered us. People who believe in this theory believe that if God ordered for us to do something, then it is good morally, but, if God prohibited something, then it is wrong morally. Also, God created all humans with free will so we each have the choice to live morally right, by following what God wants us to do, or morally incorrect, by committing acts that God has banned (Rachels p. 53).
There are many appealing characteristics to the Divine Command Theory. First, it addresses the problem that is usually faced in ethics because it gets rid of the personal emotions in ethics and makes it objective. There is no subjectivity in it because whatever God allows is good and whatever He doesn’t want us to do is bad. Also, because God is going to judge us at the end of our lives, it is important to still live morally well and not just worry about only you. In other words, any actions that negatively affect other humans will be attributed to you and you may not be looked highly upon by God (Rachels p.
…show more content…
This problem proves that there is a separate standard of right and wrong that has nothing to do with God or His commands. Most believers want to acknowledge an idea that right and wrong was created by their religion and God because they think they are not religious if they don’t associate right and wrong with God. Since this theory fails to connect morality with God, then believers of Him would dismiss it. This dismissal of the theory should not alter their faith in God, though. Many scholars and believers, like St. Thomas Aquinas, refused the Divine Command Theory for this reason but still believe in God and His instructions. They still believe in God because they are able, and willing, to associate their ethics with religion from a different perspective (Rachels p. 56).
In conclusion, the Divine Command Theory is very important in Philosophy and Ethics. Even though the different parts of it contribute to its difficulty to fully comprehend, it is a necessary topic to study. It is also important to learn about the Euthypro Problem that accompanies the theory because, without the problem, the person would not know why the theory leads to the conclusion that morality is not associated with the will of God. Lastly, it is vital to know that one can still believe in God even if morality is not handed down by Him, just like what St. Aquinas

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    My own view on faith is that it is not a strong enough argument for proof of Gods existence. I agree with Dawkins that to believe something to be true there must be some kind of real evidence. I believe that most people would agree that evidence should be required to prove God exists but many people would argue there is no evidence against God’s…

    • 937 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The problem with this is that for his argument Clarke does not explain fully what the relationship is between people and morality. When he talks about “Fitness and Unfitness”, he addresses people worship and praising of God which just means that people can try to imitate God and try to fulfill his will, but they can never be God. He also doesn’t help to explain if good is necessarily bad. He does however address later in his writing that people know that things are bad, and things are good because we can use rational thinking to understand the difference. He says that men should obey God opposed to disobeying him, but this also do to God has the power to punish man if he does not obey his will.…

    • 1371 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Philosophical educator Crash Course, stresses that if the rules of morality are taken from something other than God, then why can others not just find that source and figure out morality for themselves (Crash Course). God no longer needs to command actions if the knowledge of it is available outside of him. This eliminates God from DCT, leaving their view without a commander. DCT is thus false because it is no longer up to God to command moral actions and DCT strictly states the opposite. Although DCT is flawed, Divine Command Theorist could possibly object the Euthyphro Dilemma in efforts to prove their…

    • 1259 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    To start, this dilemma of looking to religious teachings as a moral guide is important because many people look to a god to guide them morally, while others do not believe in any god. However, religion is still a large part of philosophy. The strongest argument in favor of this view is, as stated by Shafer-Landau, the Divine Command Theory, which holds that “acts are right just because God commands them” (Shafer-Landau 2). In standard form, the argument would look like this: P1: Acts commanded by God are morally right, and those not commanded are morally wrong. P2: God’s commands are in the Bible and other religious texts/teachings.…

    • 802 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Do God And Evil Coincide?

    • 1284 Words
    • 6 Pages

    His argument is that if God is all-good he would not create evil and if he is all-powerful then he would eliminate evil. He also says that you could deny the fact that evil exists, but it does exist. He also states that the people who claim God is not all-good do not mean it and that the people who claim He is not all-powerful do not mean it, however for God to be God he has to wholly be good and powerful. His argument is then supposed to prove that there is no God. He says that we try to come up with solutions so that God can logically exist, but they all fail at creating any logical arguments.…

    • 1284 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This way of thinking can be denoted has a confirmation bias because they accept, seek out, and remember things that support their view. They also interpret things in a way that support their views. Since God is invisible, people tend to attribute their own moral beliefs to God, rather than try to change what they think is right or wrong according to some objective judgement about what God thinks. Since they cannot directly know what God is thinking, this unfortunately leads to the confirmation bias where the substitute their beliefs for that of God and think their beliefs are…

    • 842 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This theodicy is known as the Soul-Making theodicy and was presented by English philosopher of religion, John Hick. Unlike the Free Will theodicy, which argues that God created a perfect place, which we then ruined through our own poor choices, Hick argues that God deliberately created us "unfinished", and our lives on Earth are designed to toughen us up. Hick states, "The harshness of life gives us a robust texture and character that wouldn’t be possible without an imperfect world". Hick argues that God is trying to mold us into a particular type of being, and in order to do this we need an environment that is suited to the type of growth God wants, one that this "incomplete" world makes possible. How can a person know happiness if they have not felt…

    • 1336 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Divine Command Theory explains that actions are good if and only if God commands them, and actions are bad if and only if God forbids them. This makes the Divine Command Theory independent of human thought and feeling, it is God who determines what actions are moral. If we were to disobey God that would be an immoral thing to do and thus, we would be punished. We are motivated to follow this theory because it is the only reason why we still follow moral laws. If we were to believe that God did not exist, then there would be no reason for people to do the right thing.…

    • 762 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    God exhibits the true moral laws, the ten commandments, and commands us to follow them or else he will punish us. In a morally relativistic culture, the only reason that one would or wouldn’t do anything is to avoid possible consequences. Possible consequences include punishment, which assumes ethical egoism. You want to avoid punishment for your own interest. We obey because it is important to obey your creator, however then comes into question who your creator may be.…

    • 1666 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Thomas Aquinas Argument

    • 1807 Words
    • 8 Pages

    At first it seems unfair to have an eternal punishment for a finite being who commits finite crimes. This idea has turned many people away from the Christian tradition because they do not want to follow a God that they think is unjust and cruel. However, in this ideology God is neither evil nor cruel nor unjust. He is simply acting in perfect justification that is required by his nature. God, in this manner can regain his qualities of completely good and able to send people to an eternal punishment of they choose.…

    • 1807 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays