Terrorism And Rhetorical Analysis

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Terrorism is, by its very nature, disruptive in international peace and security through purposeful, political violence. On the morning of September 11th, 2001, the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon disrupted the not only the American economy, but also took a swing at the global economy. The attacks generated and progressed widespread fear, trepidation and economic disorder throughout the years with profound and lasting effects. One of these being the beefing up of the nations’ security measures. Some of which having infringed upon the basic civil liberties we enjoy.
According to the UNSC (United Nations Security Council), one of, if not the, main objectives of the attack was to instigate a global state of chaos by trying to influence
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As the rise of Islamophobia and overall fear of terrorism becomes a part of daily life for many around the world, various nations become associated in these fears. Questions of the role of Islam in terrorist activities and accusations against the United States have also risen in a great plethora and cannot simply be shrugged off. As well since 9/11, the United States discourse has tended to deploy simultaneously universal human rights rhetoric to justify and make look good the actions the United States have dished out in the name of defeating terrorists. With this comes an idea about U.S. sovereignty as democratic or particular in its constitutional structure to deny the reality of the looking into of the actions of the United …show more content…
One of the first measures taken by USA was passing two of the most controversial acts in our nation’s history (after some details came to light following Edward Snowden’s NSA whistleblowing) the Patriot Act on October 26, 2001, and later Homeland Security Act of 2002, in response to attacks, which dramatically expanded the authority of American law enforcement for the stated purpose of fighting terrorism in both the United States and abroad. It has also been used to detect and prosecute other alleged potential crimes, such as providing false information on terrorism. Nonetheless, Homeland Security Act of 2002 was deemed unconstitutional, since it had nullified a number of civil rights, such as the rights to: freedom of speech, religion, assembly and privacy; the rights to counsel and due process; and protection from unreasonable searches and

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