Summary: The Cuban Revolution

Improved Essays
Fidel Castro seized power in Cuba with a revolution in January 1959. The United States was becoming increasingly critical of Fidel Castro's government. CIA Director Allen Dulles warned, “Cuba was drifting towards Communism.” Castro had close ties to the Soviet Union who provided Cuba with air and military assistance. The U.S. planned to overthrow Castro's administration, a task taken on by the CIA. The U.S. also hoped that the invasion would stimulate an uprising against the Castro regime allowing for the creation of a pro-U.S. democratic government in Cuba of which the U.S. had already selected José Miró Cardona to lead the invasion and take over as president of Cuba if the invasion succeeded. The CIA presented a plan to overthrow Castro …show more content…
January 28th 1961 Kennedy authorized the continuation of the invasion. Kennedy’s committee approved the invasion on February 7th 1960. The plan’s success was contingent on 3,500 Cubans expected to join the force to overthrow Castro, they would assist the 1,500 men they started off with. The CIA later saw that Castro had more support in Cuba than originally anticipated and that the plan should be adjusted accordingly. Kennedy’s committee ignored th¬is. On March 11th Kennedy had a formal approval meeting. At the meeting Rusk advised Kennedy to disapprove the plan in fear that U.S. involvement would be apparent, the President agreed. The CIA found another option for a landing site, the Bay of Pigs. The Joint Chiefs of Staff estimated this new site had less than a 50% chance of success. On April 4th the CIA presented a more finalized plan. At the meeting Kennedy impatiently asked for votes and rejected further discussions. The plan was …show more content…
After the first strike Dean Rusk suggested to the President that he cancel the second strike because the second strike they weren’t fully prepared, Kennedy listened. The CIA public cover story exposed many of their lies embarrassing the United States. April 16th Kennedy approved the invasion. The attack fell apart quickly, Castro destroyed all but one trip, and the trained brigade ran out of ammunition prior to the completion of the attack. The brigade requested aid from U.S. jets, Kennedy decline in order to maintain his appearance of resisting military involvement. Kennedy ordered the CIA to get the brigade out of Cuba, but escape options were never planned or discussed. By April 19th the brigade began to surrender. Of The 1300 men sent to attack Cuba 1200 were captured and the other 100 were killed. Admiral Arleigh Burke urged Kennedy to assist using military effort; Kennedy wanted to keep up his appearances so he refused. Chief of CIA Operations, Richard Bissell, was displeased with the President that he would not intervene when he had U.S. armed forces at his

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Cuban Revolution Summary

    • 1650 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Summary The Cuban revolution was a trial and error time for Cuba with many attempts to overthrow the dictatorship Fulgencio Batista. This revolution began in 1952 when Batista seized power. This happen when he realized that he was not going to win president that term.The elections were cancelled as soon as Batista became dictator. As soon as this happen a politician named Fidel Castro (who was likely to win a seat in congress) began plotting Batista’s downfall immediately. Castro became the revolution's…

    • 1650 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    role on The Cuban Communist Revolution. Not only many of them fought in The Revolution, but also some of them took leadership roles. Vilma Espín, Tete Puebla, Celia Sánchez, Melba Hernández and Haydée Santamaría, were some of the leaders and heroines that fought hand by hand with Fidel Castro, who believed that: “The day must come when we have a Party of men and women, and a leadership of men and women, and a State of men and women, and a Government of men and women.” After the revolution, the new…

    • 411 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The most prevalent argument in Julia Sweig’s Inside the Cuban Revolution: Fidel Castro and the Urban Underground is the importance that the llano played in the insurgency. The book also attempts to debunk the myth’s surrounding Che, Castro, and the sierra-llano conflict. Through her never before seen evidence, we get a new look into the essential role that these revolutionary women played in the leadership of the Sierra Maestra alongside Castro, as well as in the urban underground. (Add more info…

    • 626 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays