Strengths-Based Assessment In Nursing

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This essay comprises of a strengths based assessment which was conducted in a stroke rehabilitation facility. Names throughout have been changed to maintain privacy of the client. Mike (pseudonym) was admitted after he suffered from a hemorrhagic stroke. Planning care was conducted in collaboration with Mike to utilise strengths in order to gain a desired outcome when planning his care. The strengths assessment used relates accordingly to competencies 3.1 and 3.2 within interpersonal relationships, the third domain of Nursing Council of New Zealand’s Competencies (Nursing Council of New Zealand [NCNZ], 2012, p. 5). Further enhancing on the care plan, a strengths based recovery approach was used to enable two goals to be established in partnership …show more content…
Each phase is characterised by identifiable skills required by the nurse to maintain optimum levels of communication and rapport (Day, Levett-Jones & Kenny, 2012, p. 538). The Preinteraction stage consists of gathering information and planning before conducting the assessment (Day, Levett-Jones & Kenny, 2012, p. 539). In order to achieve this, I read Mikes personal folder, and spoke to his wife and health care professionals before introducing myself to him. Secondly, the Introductory phase requires the patient and nurse to meet and identify the roles of both parties, therefore developing trust and planning future meetings (Day, Levett-Jones & Kenny, 2012, p. 539). This phase was achieved when I spent time with Mike on his own and with his wife. I ensured that the times I met with him were not rushed, therefore giving Mike and his needs my full attention and establish what his needs, worries or concerns may be. Following, is the Working phase. This phase focusses on further enhancing trust and rapport therefore developing a stronger relationship (Day, Levett-Jones & Kenny, 2012, p. 539). During this phase, I was able to gain consent from Mike before establishing goals which he believed to be important to his wellbeing. These goals were recognised through asking questions and listening courteously to his answers (Day, Levett-Jones & Kenny, 2012, …show more content…
This goal was applied with the nursing intervention of including Mike in the daily breakfast club. Findley (2013) states that there are many health benefits of a breakfast club. It promotes independence as well as engaging the patients socially (para. 6). The breakfast club enabled Mike to independently prepare meals and facilitate the functional use of his affected limb. Because Mike used to thoroughly enjoy preparing meals and house work, this intervention proved to be relevant towards his strengths. The independence that was available to Mike increased his confidence and self-esteem, this was evident when he started looking forward until the next breakfast club. Positive outcomes of this intervention is that unknowingly Mike was socialising without trying and therefore his mood increased. The second intervention that could be applied is to encourage Mike to independently wash and dry himself, the nurse could maintain hygiene privacy and wait outside the door until Mike calls thus enabling Mike to develop ways of washing that are suitable to what he is capable of doing. Resnick (2004) states that promoting independence in washing can improve hygiene and restore dignity (p. 83). The nurse could also promote independence by collecting and making bathing supplies easily accessible for Mike to use. Achievement of these interventions will enable

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