State Labour Relations In Maharashtra

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formally employed. The unique class interests of informally employed workers were ignored by the CPM leaders. So the informal sector workers i.e. the class conscious proletariats must transform themselves into a revolutionary class-for-itself so that it can eventually seize political power from the bourgeoisie. This book forces the readers to ponder over the state-labour relations as state is nothing but means of projecting the class interest of the bourgeoisie. The informal sector workers can also be termed as a class for itself that can be liberated by a socialist revolution. Subramanyam Thakur, secretary of AITUC (All India Trade Union Congress), the union federation affiliated with the Communist Party of …show more content…
The absence of pro-poor electoral competition present in the state but the interest of the political leaders of the state in liberalization and privatization ensured minimal welfare gains of the informal workers in Maharashtra.. The state of Maharashtra lies in between West Bengal and Tamil Nadu as far as the welfare of the informal sector is concerned. The state of Tamil Nadu showed more interest for protecting the informal workers than Maharashtra .But in comparison to West Bengal the state officials of Maharashtra were more eager in protecting informally employed workers. In Maharashtra the private-sector is industrialized very rapidly which has increased the state government’s interest in unregulated, informal …show more content…
She studied four states which differ economically and politically and it can be inferred from the book that the informal workers are a vital part of modern class structure and they have formed new types of political attachments with the state for improving their livelihood rather than placing their demands in front of the footloose employers. These demands of the informal workers are met through industry-specific welfare

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