Communist Manifesto Critical Analysis

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In 1848, Karl Marx and Fredrick Engels published ‘The Communist Manifesto’ that was aimed at presenting the arguments, goals, and platform of Communism. The publication was a commissioned work that was intended to articulate the objective and platform of the Communist League, an international political party founded in 1847 in London, England. The authors point out the benefits of communism and the need for its application in the future. Besides, the manifesto was a proposal reading stabilization of the class structure in the society without conflict. The authors argue that historical developments have been impacted by the class struggles, with the rich battling with the poor and the exploitation of one class by another. They propose that with …show more content…
In the first preamble of the manifesto; ‘Bourgeois and Proletarians’, the authors explain the capitalist mode of production that is associated with conflicts between classes. The Bourgeois exploit and oppress the proletariat through competition and private ownership of property, including land. However, the capitalist mode of production becomes incompatible with the exploitative and oppressive relationship, contributing to the proletariat leading a revolution. On the contrary, the revolution will be different from the previous class relationships in that the new ruling class will not be driven towards reallocation of property. Instead, the new ruling class, the proletariat, when in control, will abolish the ownership of private property and the classes will disappear (Marx & Engels, 1848). Marx and Engels (1848) state the resulting conflict and revolution can be solved through the adoption of Communism, whereby there are no class distinctions in the society. In the second preamble; ‘Proletarians and Communists’, Marx and Engels explores the relationship between the communism and the working class. They state that the Communism would be organized in favor of the proletariat and focus on their interests rather than those of a specific class (Marx & Engels, 1848). They expound on the characteristics of the Communist …show more content…
Although the present society has not changed much with the crisis of working class still prevalent, the ideas of the manifesto still make sense to the contemporary society. The working class in the present society is different from that existing in 1848. Globally the working class has become more organized and more substantial than before. For intake, in 2013, China recorded an increase of more than 29 million industrial workers, and in the U.S the labor force was at 155 million. Although the working class has changed some of the observations of the Communist Manifesto apply to the workers that rely on the wages to pay bills and make a living. Additionally, the Communist Manifesto is relevant in China today, which has adopted a communist platform. In 2007, the Republic of China adopted the National People’s Congress that allowed creation, transfer, and ownership of property. The entrepreneurs in China have a right to own private property and conduct private businesses. Nonetheless, the communism culture has not been fully adopted since the platform has faced resistance from most of the citizens (Wasserstrom,

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