Stalin's Influence On China

2110 Words 9 Pages
talin had hoped to adopt and export the Soviet-style of communism and use it to forge for collaborations with the states surrounding the Soviet. China, being the largest and the newest member of the states that were allied to the Soviet was the major focus of Stalin’s foreign policy interests. Since China lacked modernization, this was a perfect opportunity and, therefore, it would receive assistance. In addition, heavy damage was inflicted on China during the Japanese occupation as well as by the anti-imperialist statements as a result of American-supported Chinese Republicans. However, there was a complex relationship between the communist states. There were always feelings of resentment, exploitation, and antagonism. Before the rift, Sino-Soviet …show more content…
In the whole of China, Stalin was hailed as the greatest leader when he was alive and even after death. He was a leader of the world revolution and a teacher of the Chinese people. Given the level of the legacy that Stalin had in the while of China, Khrushchev was not taken well, especially by the older generation who were more comfortable with Stalin doctrines. Therefore, Khrushchev decided to initiate a political movement which aimed at the unveiling and exposing all the atrocities cause by Stalin in order to counter the adoration that he enjoyed from the people of China. By portraying Stalin as a tyrant and a butcher as well as promising to pursue different ideologies from his, Khrushchev hoped to capture the China’s attention and extend their relationship (Conquest 67). Another reason for the Sino-Soviet Split was the existing disputes between China and the Soviet Union on matters of policies towards the US and its allies. While Russia took a confrontational attitude towards the United States and the West during Stalin’s era, Khrushchev tried to promote the idea of peaceful co-existence between Russia and the US after realizing that a confrontation was not realistic for Russia. On the other hand, Mao refuted Russia’s decision arguing that the West should continue to be combated with. To the Communist China, pursuing capitalism was as a form of betrayal to the …show more content…
With the Cold War, Khrushchev realized that the communist movement was a losing battle and therefore decided to pursue a peaceful co-existence with the West (Luthi). On the other hand, for China, the war was the most effective way of spreading communism unlike peaceful co-existence arguing the case of Bolshevik Party which rose to power as a result of World War II. During the Camp David Talks between the US president and Khrushchev, the rift between the Communist China and the Soviet Union further increased as Mao failed to see the need for peaceful co-existence and how it would have helped in spreading communism. The failure by Khrushchev to follow Marxist-Leninist made Mao to term Khrushchev as a revisionist in the view of subsequent political and economic development. According to Mao, the East was above the West having orbited a satellite and developed the Intercontinental Ballistic Missile, and therefore, instead of pursuing peaceful relationships, it was time to start World War III as a way of spreading communism worldwide. However, Soviet was not ready for such a full-scale war and disapproved Mao as a dogmatist who sought to pursue extreme left-wing policies while failing to pay attention to the current political

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