China's Unpeaceful Rise Analysis

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The concept surrounding China’s unpeaceful rise is a fundamental complex debate. In the article, Chinas Unpeaceful Rise, one is exposed to John J. Mearsheimer’s subjective view which states that Chinas rise will be one absence of peace and one accustomed to war. In accordance, the United States, due to the theory of international politics, will ensure that China’s attempt to establish regional hegemony will be challenged by the United States. According to John J. Mearsheimer’s understanding of international politics most prominent goal of state survival and to maximise power over the world and the overall system, Mearsheimer believes that in order for Chins to gain a position of overpowering security, she will attempt to rule the Asia-Pacific …show more content…
He highlights the historical events of world war one and two and reinforces the violent action America took in order to ‘rise to power’ and remain most powerful. These actions included the dismantling and defeat of arising hegemons which could be recognized as majestic Germany between years 1900-1918, the great japan between 1931 to 1945, twelve rising years for Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1945 and lastly the soviet union during the cold war period of 1945 to 1989 (Mearsheimer, 2006). This further portrays the idea that as Americas rise to power was not peaceful, so too will China’s be absent of peace as well. Another part of Mearsheimer’s argument was the idea that the United States will ensure that China’s attempt to establish regional hegemony will be challenged as visibly seen through America’s previous capability of ridding arising regional hegemony’s. Moreover, it can be seen through America’s actions during the old war that challenges to her power was going to aspire violence. It can be seen that the United States involvement in the cold war was undoubtedly in order to prevent Russia from taking over Eurasia and therefore becoming more powerful and a greater threat. This can be related to the way in which America views China as an uprising threat as a result of their visible economic power and great a great potential threat to American …show more content…
Together with that, his theory reinforces the notion that China’s rise to power further poses a threat to American Power. It is this knowledge which persuades Mersheimer’s argument. Mersheimer claims that if China continues to engage in great economic growth, a war is between the Unites states and China is most probable. The greater the threat China becomes to America, the less peaceful its rise to power will become and the deeper the tension between the two superpowers will be. This notion is based on the John k. Mearsheimer’s policy of international politics which is concerned with the idea of how additional states are to react to rising great powers (Mearsheimer, 2006). The idea that China is a competitor for the power of Asia will further portray tension between the main superpower, America, and the rising super power, China (Hurrel, A.

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