Why Was The Cold War Inevitable

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The belief that the Cold War was inevitable is completely false. Undoubtedly there would be tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union after the war, but to claim that their disagreements would inevitably result in some degree of a Cold War is inaccurate. Had the countries resolved their disagreements in a more diplomatic fashion, there would be no form of a Cold War, there would only be slight tension. To say that the Cold War was inevitable is to deny that Truman and Stalin and their inflexible definition of diplomacy were not key contributors to the Cold War. The Cold War was a contrived conflict, where two powers were ignorant towards the belief systems of each other. The roots of the Cold War were founded on speculation, a …show more content…
The main cause of the Cold War was miscommunication followed by an unwillingness to fix these misconceptions. Both America and the Soviet Union were unwilling to sort through the problems they had. They never released the tension they felt towards each other, this tension was bound to come out, but each country suppressed its tension, and released it in devastating ways. The War acted as a buffer between the Soviet Union and the United Sates, since both countries had a common enemy they became closer as they tried to defeat Germany, but the Soviet Union and the United states were never friends and hardly cordial. The Cold War was the fault on the Soviet Union an American policies. The Cold War was simply an opportunity for each country to try and prove its superiority and served no true purpose except as an outlet for each country to express its superiority. The Cold War the sole fault of Soviet and American policy, which lead to the arms race, the lack of solving territorial disputes, and the fear of loosing …show more content…
However, just because Stalin and Truman had vastly different political ideologies doesn’t mean the Cold War was inevitable. A large part of why the Cold war escalated to the height it did was because of a general lack of cooperation and understanding and an unwillingness to discuss territorial dispute from both the Soviets and Americans. Ironically, despite having deep feelings of hatred towards each other’s country Stalin and Truman met in person only one time (Patterson 108). Truman believed he could deal with Stalin, but the actions he took proved otherwise (109). The fact that Stalin and Truman only met once shows that the two countries were equally guilty of not wanting to deal with the problem at hand. Any issue that arose was solved with a worthless, extremely temporary plan (Brinkley768-769). When trying to divide land and implement spheres of influence Soviets and Americans each country tried to put off the issue of which political system the country would use in order to appease the each other (768). At the Teheran Conference Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin met to discuss the strategies for the remainder of the war along with the fate of countries such as Poland (768). Churchill and Roosevelt compromised and allowed the Soviet Union to take part of eastern Poland. In the end, the leaders were unable to compromise on the political structure of Poland.

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