Ontological Argument

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Theists think that it is ridiculous that the Universe can exist without a cause, and, have come to the assumption that the universe was created by God, who exists without a cause, complete with a range of intrinsic traits and values. We can see that although theists believe in god(s) and atheists don 't, both have some similar assumptions about how the universe came to exist.

St Anselm (1033-1109), who was the Catholic archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church, first created the Ontological Argument. This is among one of the strangest arguments as well as also being one of the most debated. The ontological argument is notable due to its claim of the existence of God by basing its evidence solely on human reason and without any
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It is an interesting argument because it states that God, a perfect being, must exist in all possible circumstances in order to satisfy the definition of his perfection. A God that can exist in only some circumstances, but fails to exist in others is a less than perfect being.

The Catholic thinker and philosopher, St Thomas Aquinas (1224-1274), summarised his cosmological argument which speaks of five ways in which people can determine the existence of God. His cosmological argument declares that things in existence are set in motion and are constantly changing. Aquinas says that, “Whatever is set in motion must be put in motion by another.” He also mentions that this chain cannot go on forever or be infinite and that there must have been a first cause. This first cause, as argued by Aquinas among other Catholics, is God. Aquinas’ argument states that everything has a purpose or a beginning except God, who has always existed and requires no creator or in Aquinas’ words,
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One argument by Vexen Crabtree is about how God is logically impossible and cannot have been the first cause as much of what makes god is contradictory towards him being the sole creator.
The Argument from Incoherence argues that the concept of god is very self-contradictory and also impossible. Both omnipotence and omniscience are contradictory to free will as well as being logically impossible. Its omniscience is impossible for it to validate and there are questions about its own being and very existence that are impossible for it to answer, this therefore means that nothing can be omniscient. If it is a perfect being, then there is no need for it to create anything. If it is eternal and immutable, its very thoughts are eternal and immutable, or in other words, it does not have mental states. Since its basic emotional, behavioural and instinctive drives are all set, and not created by the being itself, it is therefore not under its own

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