Essay On Anselm's Ontological Argument

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Anselm’s Ontological Argument Anselm creates the Ontological argument with one primary goal. He claims to succeed in developing an argument of the existence of God without the requirement of actual proof. Anselm 's reasoning and argument only gives a mere opinion on the topic of the existence of God. He formulates a two part hypothesis consisting of: God exists and God has always existed. Anselm’s Ontological argument expresses accusations that are simply in his favor or his outlook on God. A premise of the argument is that any person who does not exist in one world cannot simply exist in another and that this person is less perfect than one who exists in all worlds, which could only be true with actual proof. Primarily, Anselm’s argument …show more content…
No matter how great something is, it is always possible to think of something greater. Gaunilo does agree with Anselm that things should not only be admitted in the understanding, but as well in reality. Anselm makes an assertion that Gaunilo 's logic only works for God, not for the perfect and conceivable island, which again does not make much sense without the existence of proof. One could not possibly conclude that anyone or anything exist from the simple idea that it exists in one’s mind. Along with this objection, it starts to spark the idea to question the entire argument. Gaunilo still does not completely refer to anything that could prove the essence of God and his all-powerful and all-existing actions, yet he does make it completely clear that something cannot actually exist in a mental world and expect to exist in an actual world as well. In other words, Gaunilo tries to explain that it could not possibly be as simple creating thought of the existence of

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