Society: The Three Phases Of The French Revolution

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During the French Revolution society was made up of three separate phases. The three that are brought up are the Moderate Phase, the Radical Phase, and the Thermidor Phase. The people of the French Revolution created the phases to change the form of government and society. The Moderate phase and Radical phase can be shown throughout the French Revolution. The Moderate Phase existed to form a new form of government known as a monarchy. This phase was also an attempt for the different social classes to make an impact on the government in a peaceful way. The Radical Phase was brought into play by forming a new government when the moderate phase didn’t succeed. Instead of a monarchy, the new form that the people wanted was a democratic republic. …show more content…
Since the people of France knew that they could now have rights as a citizen, they didn’t want to stop. The goals of the Radical phase included: male suffrage, a separation from the church, women’s rights, redistribution of wealth, and the formation of a Democratic Republic. The first “radical” attempt was the trial and execution of King Louis XVI. This happened when, “The king tried to flee Paris in 1791” (PowerPoint). After this event, the people wanted to do more damage to the government. The citizens put in charge Maximilien Francois Marie or Robespierre. This man was considered the most powerful man during the Radical phase. Robespierre wanted the same thing that the people of France did, a formation of a democratic republic, however he did it with a new idea. The people called the time that Robespierre was in charge the Reign of Terror. He created this to put fear into people that wanted to go against the new ideas. He executed people that were considered the “enemies of the Revolution.” In the year of 1793 and 1794, between 25 thousand and 50 thousand people were executed by the men of Robespierre. The people that were on Robespierre’s side were called the Jacobins. A Jacobin is the pro-revolution people of France. The enemies of the revolution were called the Girondins. Even though Robespierre killed thousands of people, he believed he did it for the sake of the people to form a new government. As he stated, “Terror is nothing other than justice, prompt, severe, inflexible; it is therefore an emanation of virtue; it is not so much a special principle as it is a consequence of the general principle of democracy applied to our country 's most urgent needs” (Terror and Virtue Letter). The Reign of Terror ended when the citizens put Robespierre on trial and executed him in 1794. Even with many deaths, fears, and changes

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