Six Principles Of The Constitution

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Six Principles When the Constitution was made they came up with the six principles. They include popular sovereignty, limited government, separation of powers, checks and balances, judicial review and federalism. These are important to the framers and the United States people because they say the people have the power and how the power is to be separated amongst the government. Popular sovereignty and limited government are similar because in both it states that the people have to power. Popular sovereignty is the people giving power to the state and federal government through the Constitution. For example, the preamble of the Constitution is “We the people..,” the Constitution came from the people and is setting the government up and telling them how we want …show more content…
Madison case. It is the court's power to determine if congress’ laws are legal or if the Presidential actions are constitutional. This is proof that the President doesn’t have all the power, but the courts can overrule him. Federalism is the government's power being shared and divided among both the national and state or local governments. The government is still strong even with the states and local governments. Article V is a great example of federalism. It states that congress must propose amendments which states have to approve in order to get it into the Constitution. This purpose is so that the government can’t make amendments that aren’t in favor of the people. The six principles include federalism, judicial review, checks and balances, separation of powers, limited government, and popular sovereignty. Without the six principles, we wouldn’t have a say in anything that pertains to us. The government could completely take over and we would have little to no rights. The Constitution was made by the people and is for the people. Therefore, the purpose of the principles is for the people’s

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