Similarities Between Lenin And Stalin

Improved Essays
Both Stalin and Lenin in their approaches are seeking greater industrialization amidst the agricultural sector. They are likewise concerned with the threat of capitalism.
Lenin, in his New Economic Plan, is focused internally. In Lenin’s The NEP ‘A Strategical Retreat section, Lenin references a political crisis caused by the implementation of the party’s surplus-food appropriation program in the rural districts (pp. 4,5). To be clear this is a byword for unrest. When the peasantry is starving, they tend to get angry and revolt. Lenin is recognizing the desperate position which the party, i.e. the state, was in. Lenin further references the gravity of the situation citing the extreme disorder with which the party was forced to reverse this
…show more content…
He introduces the New Economic policy as a means of addressing the peasants’ empty bellies, with a caveat given to the Congress of Political Education Departments that this policy would bring capitalism through the gates so to speak. Lenin argued that the only way to prevent capitalism from winning out, the average worker must not only be literate but must have some higher level of culture. In this Lenin is trying to cure the ‘cultural backwardness’ of the Russian people (pp. 12). Eliminating this backwardness is Lenin’s means of disarming the threat of capitalism invited into the country by the NEP, that is the internal threat of Capitalism. For Stalin, grain is also an important issue; however, it is to a lesser degree than Lenin. Stalin blames the grain shortage on unfavorable weather conditions (Stalin, pp. 11). If Stalin had not felt the State to be internally secure against a peasant uprising, he would not have been so dismissive of this famine. Essentially Lenin and Stalin try completely opposite approaches to the same problem. Lenin, albeit due to a forced hand, seeks to bring agricultural industrialization by re-introducing capitalistic practices, while Stalin wants to increase the State influence in the agricultural sector by using the model of large State-run farms to encourage peasants to join them to share in the profits brought by economies of …show more content…
Stalin calls these petty-bourgeoisies traitors to Marxism and capitalist puppets—all the while insisting that he, Stalin, is a Leninist. Claiming to be a Leninist while arguing against a policy implemented by Lenin involved quite the ideological sausage making; during this segment of the document Stalin both says that it was Lenin’s NEP that created the social conditions that fostered the “Right” and denied that Lenin ever instituted right or centrist policy. This exemplifies Stalin’s desires to move away from Leninist policies, meeting at the cross purpose of Stalin’s need to claim ideological continuity with

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Marxist Reforms In Russia

    • 1588 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Hence, at the time of the 1917 Russian revolution, Marxism had gained subsequent popularity since peasants believed that the capitalist framework enhanced poverty. The avant-garde was predominantly a socialist revolution that was concerned with improving working conditions of the working class. To oppose the Tsar, Lenin seconded by Stalin were required to institute an authoritarian ruler-ship style. In particular, the Bolsheviks needed to establish a proletariat in the face of enormous difficulties. The party saw itself as the vanguard of the revolution taking on the role of organizing the workers and steering a path towards achieving a socialist state.…

    • 1588 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Rise Of Stalinism

    • 1601 Words
    • 7 Pages

    This required a centralization of powers and an acceleration of technological progress, and Stalin devised a central planned economy that would allow the state to have complete control over economic production. As an alternative to the capitalist free market, the planned economy allowed Stalin to hone in on specific goals for Russian. Stalin pushed heavily for increased industrial production, which had been lacking in his traditionally agricultural society. This need for industrialization comes directly from Marxism, where socialism is seen, particularly by Bolsheviks, as an advanced industrial society where the means of production are owned by the workers. Stalin’s collectivization of agriculture was too a step away from capitalism, eliminating a sense of ownership (Riasanovksy 444).…

    • 1601 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Lenin And Populism

    • 1279 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Populism is the doctrine of achieving social justice and equality. The populists in Russia formed the Social Revolutionary Party, whom the Bolsheviks were against. However, Lenin had to gain the favor of the working class and peasants. He used propaganda, and he promised the people that he will give them the things they want. The peasants still wanted more land, there was a shortage of food, and they wanted World War I to end.…

    • 1279 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Further, borrowing from the Master-Slave dialectic, Lukács argues that the proletariat has more power to end reification while the bourgeoise might even intensify it. This contradiction of the capitalist society is essential to its decline. This decline while not really a transformative revolution but over time will allow the proletariat to rise in power. Therefore, class consciousness is the essential characteristic of revolutionary politics. The transformation of society through the communist revolution will only arise…

    • 757 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, Marx viewed the Soviet revolution as an economic process of “historical materialism” that sought to overthrow capitalism and class conflict by installing a proletariat government that would take control of the land, industry, and modernization. Marx’s theory defines the removal of private ownership of industry and the economy from the capitalist bourgeoisie to the state, which would now manage the economy through the collectivist government of the proletariat. Transitional communist policies, such “war communism” were part of Lenin and Stalin’s “purge” of capitalist modes of industry and class orientation that Marx sought to enforce the communist state. In essence, the development of the communist bureaucracy and…

    • 1834 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    War; has forced social groups into political associations which create anarchy in society to understand capitalism 's role in “geopolitical deficiency.” This means that Putin and Russia’s desire is absolute gain. Should Russian’s put up with the required economic sacrifices, or will they eventually prefer greater prosperity to national pride? According to Putin and his propaganda machine; Yes. Relations between states are the most importantly factor, but with secondary importance in this capitalist war over historical human…

    • 826 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Although the State did allow small plots of land to be owned, they disapproved of the kulaks’ private ownership of land as it was discordant with the Party’s beliefs. In fact, Stalin classified kulaks as class enemies as he believed that their economic principles were based on the capitalistic notion of “exploit[ing] the working class” (160). As the kulaks as hostile entities who were “sworn enemies of the collective-farm movement” and of socialism, Stalin wanted to eliminate them completely (179). Thus, he undertook this endeavor in an aggressive manner: he confiscated the kulaks’ land and properties. Moreover, he legislated a mass extermination of the kulaks or had them exiled to Siberia or remote regions within the Soviet Union.…

    • 1157 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Marx says that the interests of communists are the same as the interests of the proletariat. The primary idea of communists the revolutionary proletariat and the communist is abolition of private property, for that is the reason that keeps them enslaved. Bourgeois capitalism theory is that the owners of the means of production only pay the workers enough to ensure that they will be healthy and reproduce more children who will end up working for the factory. The formation of bourgeois property relies on its unequal distribution of wealth to the proletariat. If the proletariat decides it wants to free itself from bourgeois oppression, then their goal must be to abolish capitalism.…

    • 987 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Along with monitoring and control of information surpassing each and every mind. Even so, in Brave New World, Huxley has placed the World Controllers and Director of Hatcheries to be in charge of command. As a matter of fact, they ruled the opposite method of the Party’s strategies, rather than brute and force, they’ll convince their citizens to feel happy and to cling onto their source and place of comfort. As a result, totalitarian ideas was seen as a way to restore stability on a country’s economy and in place conduct. Like how Stalin demanded low-class citizens to work on government-run farms instead of working on their land.…

    • 1056 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Orwell displays this economic system in the novella as communism where social class is abolished. The common goal is to have a shared ownership of production, rather than division amongst society. However, as the text progresses, a shift in the economic system is seen. New ideologies arise when the urge to be driven by the means of production is desired. Napoleon, is an emerging leader of Animal Farm after Snowball’s position is overthrown, and had stated the idea of the windmill was opposed as “simply as a manoeuvre to get rid of Snowball, who was a dangerous character and a bad influence” (Orwell, 39).…

    • 1078 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays