African American Civil Rights Movement

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The history of African American culture is very significant to the United States and the rest of the world. African American’s have a unique history because no other race has gone through as much back lash and adversity. Perhaps the most unique part about the history of African Americans is the civil rights movement. The Civil rights movement changed the landscape of the world and how everybody viewed racism. The reason why is because so much of it was going on in the southern part of the United States. The southern part of the United States during the civil rights movement had the most ignorance and racism the world had ever seen. During the civil rights movement, a particular group called the NAACP was very active. The NAACP was active …show more content…
They did it in forms of firing blacks from their jobs, evicting them from their homes and even going as far as refusing to give them credit. Politicians even went as far as to include white supremacy in their campaigns. Some public schools even closed all schools to prevent integration of blacks and whites. Even the landmark case Brown vs Board of Education made everything having to do with segregation in schools unconstitional, the racist southern states continued to fight for segregation. North Carolina Senator James Ervin Jr and South Carolina’s senator Strom Thurmond vowed to preserve segregation and the way of life people in the south lived. They called this “The Southern Manifesto” which covered how they would combat desegregation especially in public …show more content…
The southern part of the NAACP lost 246 branches in the south. This was detrimental to them because they were surely losing power when it came to court cases in the south. However, despite getting oppressed by the government in the south, the NCAAP desegregated 17 school systems by 1962. This helped spiked the desegregation in other things such employment and housing. The south has always been a cease pool racism but the civil rights movement helped moved the south back into desegregation. However, many white supremacist did not want the south to be desegregated, so it was hard for blacks to get anywhere. There were many violent reactions to what blacks tried to accomplish in the south. What they tried to accomplish was desegregation, which many white extremist tried to stop. The whites did things such as beat black people so they would get the message to stop their movements with the NAACP. The most violent beating of black of a black person was Emmett Till. Emmett Till was a 14 year black boy who was visiting his relatives in Mississippi. He was originally from Chicago so he did not know how racism was in the south or the tradtions southernism was accustomed

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