Summary Of Sensory Processing Disorder

If and when diagnosis is correctly done, a person suffering from Sensory Processing Disorder can start treatment for their conditions. Contrary to popular belief, the treatments in place to help patients with SPD is greatly flawed. According the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation (2015), treatment for SPD in children is often treated through occupational therapy, which tends to focus on identifying and eliminating any perceived barriers that prevent patients from being active participants in day-to-day life, with the help from many professionals such as teacher, physical, speech and listening therapist, social workers and many more professionals. Treatment is often family-centered, with loved ones collaborating with health professional …show more content…
They conducted a case study on a 7 year old boy with delayed motor skills and sensitivity to light, sound and touch and a 7 year old girl with concentration and writing problems. They underwent the same sensory diet of fine motor skills therapy and scheduled one-on-one activities. The treatment was seen as extremely helpful to the girl and less valuable for the boy. Though both children had fine motor skill issues, the girl had a concentration issue while the boy had a sensitivity issue. These are two different problems that should be dealt with as their own entity, however they were not. Hence why the girl was more successful than the boy as scheduled activities would be more beneficial to ones with concentration issues. This is a clear testament to the ineffectiveness of generalized treatment of …show more content…
Shannon Roberson, a former Occupational therapist and a mother to a son with SPD, used to believe in what many Occupational therapy institutions do for children with certain disorders or disabilities (Mama and Baby Love, 2013). In cities like Chicago, New York and Los Angles, the use of Occupational therapy has gone up over 25% in the past five years (New York Times, 2015). She used to send her son to OTs with the belief that this treatment would cure her son as she previously did with many other kids. The therapy seemed to have a positive impact on her son when he attended every hour season, four times a week. However once she had taken her son out of therapy she realized the symptoms returned. The therapy simply suppressed his symptoms rather than treating. Thus, it is clear that the Occupational therapy treatment for SPD, that was previously thought to “cure” the condition, is ineffective as it only provides a temporary fix to SPD

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