Book Of Job Moral

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One of the guarantees of human life is that we encounter or end up in situations that we do not always deserve or provoke, these situations are often beyond our control and understanding, leading to confusion, anger, and questioning. This type of unexpected situation is famously seen in “The Book of Job” from the jewish bible when Job loses his wealth, assets, and family and is plagued with a skin disease, seemingly for no reason. This situation of suffering that Job who is a “blameless and upright man” (Job 1:8) occurs due to an Adversary presenting God with the notion that Job is righteous, innocent, and blessed merely because he fears God, that if his prosperous life were taken away, he would lose faith and trust in God. The Adversary’s …show more content…
The Lord’s consent to allow Job’s misery at first seems un-godlike, rash, and unnecessarily cruel which at face value merely serve to reinforce the fear he regards God with. However the Lord’s decision to incite suffering proves to be deliberate and valid when it is viewed as a lesson, not punishment. At the onset of suffering, we see Job begin to question his own goodness; “Is injustice on my tongue? Can my palate not discern evil?” (Job 6:30) this initial questioning and search for answers highlights Job’s shallow relationship with God. Job equates his suffering with the idea that he has not been obedient or conforming enough to God’s standards of righteousness. This is a lack of understanding on Job’s behalf and part of the reason the Lord approved his suffering, with the intent to enlighten Job’s sense of faith and spirituality. In the endurance of suffering and many accusations and false, unloyal implications from his friends, Job comes to realize and accept that he is innocent, and that morality and suffering are not bound. Job speaks to God, begs questions in search of what and why his suffering is for, but God is purposeful in refraining to respond though he hears all that Job says and asks, he does not respond for that would distract Job from making realizations and …show more content…
Job’s suffering leads to transformative revelations about his spirituality and how his previous ways of belief and faith were not aligned with those of a truly spiritual and righteous man. The Lord demonstrates to Job that the suffering he endured is not a form of punishment or evil, but that it is for his own good and in the interest of his righteousness. In “The Book of Job” there is a move from pursuing spirituality out of self-interest to pursuing moral interests in the form of a personal relationship with the Lord that is not dictated by

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