Religion In The Middle Ages Essay

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After the fall of the Roman Empire, The Middle Ages was initiated, and a time of major religious and civil reformation began. The Church started to gain much more power than the governing bodies. So much that at various times, an intense struggle for religious authority and political power played out. Even as that struggle continued the Church still affected the people at that time and spread throughout the world with great speed.
Christianity had effects on the government during the middle ages with religious leaders vs. Kings and Queens. The Church had their own laws and its own courts of justice. The Church claimed authority over secular rulers, but monarchs didn’t always recognize this authority. As a result, there were common power
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For the church being the largest landholder in Europe it had a important economic power. During the Middle Ages there was a lot of Jewish communities. Numerous of Jewish societies occurred throughout Europe during the Middle Ages. While Jews in Muslin Spain and northern areas of Europe were generally tolerated, most Christians mistreated Jews. The jews were band from owning land or practicing many occupation by the church.. Many Christians also blamed Jews for the death of Jesus. There was a slipping of two branches. There were two churches during the Middle Ages, one church was on the east called the Orthodox Christian Church and in the west is the Roman Catholic Church.. The the two branches permanently split up in 1054. The Roman Catholic Church became the main stabilizing force in Western Europe. The Roman church provided religious leadership.
The Middle Ages was a very important period in time for the world. It was a time of reformation for both Church and state. The Church had great power and influence over the people then. So much so that religious and political leaders were constantly conflicting for power. The positive and negative influences of the church over the people can be seen a lot during the Middle Ages. Though most importantly, It helped shape what is our current society today and excelled Christianity around the

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