The Impact Of The Protestant Reformation On Europe

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1. The Protestant reformation had a huge impact on European society, culture and politics. Over the course of the reformation the catholic church lost a lot of its power. Protestantism was very popular among the common people as it focused on having a direct link with god, avoiding the system of bishops and priests. The reformation also sparked the thirty years war, a conflict that would change the religion climate of Europe drastically. After the end of the reformation started war the church no longer had total control over most of European society, even if the majority of European were still christian. Culturally it led to a divide in faith in the European populations. There were also political ramifications for the reformations such as how …show more content…
Christianity was widely spread in the Americas because of the European domination. With European Christians in power they forced their faith on the natives and slaves without anyone to stop them. Another reason was the fact that in the Americas there were many faiths not a just a small amount of widespread ones, and African faiths that Often conflicted allowing Christianity to gain a foothold in multiple communities that was supported by the ruling Europeans. Christianity in Asia was A Very different story, Christianity spread to a very small portion of the Asian population. In Asia Europeans did not have control over the territory and could be kicked out by reigning government at any time. This led to small missions by Europeans to convert Asian populations that largely failed. Most conversions happened in port cities as European Christian Traders interacted with Asians. In china the European Jesuits focused on converting the elite rather than the commoners in the hope that they would in turn convert the masses, this did not …show more content…
Over the course of the scientific revolution many intellectual traditions changed and a few stayed the same. One change was the creation of the university system that allowed hastened development of intellectualism as they were allowed to operate individual from the government to an extent. As science grew a change was made in how we approach it, and modern science was born through the creation of the scientific method by Francis Bacon. This advance into modern science allowed for other major advances in how Europeans thought, such as how Galileo disproved geocentrism and replaced it with heliocentrism, and how Vesalius accurately diagrammed the inner workings of the human body. Another change was that Europe became much more secular as the knowledge of nature and the world grew outside of a religious frame. This does not however mean these discoveries were made without christian influence. As a major continuity is how Christianity did stay as dominant in Europe throughout the scientific revolution. Another continuity was that some false scientific studies were done to “prove” that women were worse than men, continuing the tradition of the patriarchy from before the

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