Pros Of Vaccination

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A vaccine is a suspension of attenuated/weakened or killed microorganisms of a virus or bacteria administered for prevention, improvement of severity or treatment of infectious disease. The devastation of mankind by small pox many centuries ago lead to the origins of immunization. Smallpox is believed to have appeared around 10’000 BC. Mankind had long been trying to find a cure for this epidemic. The fatality of the disease caused deaths of hundreds of thousands of people annually while leaving the survivors with disfiguring scars and blindness.
It is believed that active immunization began in Asia, China and India with the practice of variolation. Variolation involved the deliberate inoculation of small amounts of material from smallpox
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The most effective method of ensuring that parents get their children vaccinated is the requirement of an up-to-date immunization records before children can join or attend any public schooling institutions or licensed day care facilities. The problem with this however is that every state except Mississippi and West Virginia allows children to be exempted from vaccination for religious reasons. Vaccine-preventable diseases, such as whooping cough, diphtheria, hepatitis, measles, poliomyelitis, human papillomavirus, and mumps are still a threat that results in the hospitalization of many children in the U.S. This, therefore, calls for the need for the federal governments to ensure that all children born receive …show more content…
The governments through various programs promote the vaccination of every child without exemption. Diseases cause discomfort to children and can even result in prolonged disabilities or deaths. Vaccinations help reduce and in some cases, eliminate these diseases. Polio is one example of the great impact vaccines have had in the United States. Polio was once America’s most-feared disease that caused death and paralysis of many people across the country. Today the disease has been fully contained with isolated reported

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