Pros And Cons Of Urban Sprawl

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Abstract
Urban Sprawl is an issue that a lot of cities are facing in different terms which causing other planning issues in cities; such as, traffic, lack schools, shortness in public and health services, and more. The case that will be discussed in this paper is Tucson City located in Arizona state. The Sonoran Desert is preventing Tucson from sprawling, and historically Tucson used to have urban growth boundaries that was abandoned before the 80s, later City of Tucson decided to control urban sprawl. Moreover, the extension of Tucson is leaner because of the mountains that are in the east and west sides of the city. However, urban sprawl has bros and cons that will discussed in this paper. This paper will spot the light on what urban sprawl
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Moreover, it also was the era that was named “Baby Boomers.” These two incidents made a huge expansion in US cities, and a high demand for single-family houses while the supply was low. Urban cities expanded rapidly in the US to cover the demand on housing. Transportation was another helpful reason for people to live outside urban areas. A lot of agriculture lands and forests turned to be residential suburbans. Some people name this act as the “Housing Boom.” (Bhatta 2010, P.7). All these factors caused what is named “Urban Sprawl” which caused a negative effect to the natural environment, and traffic issues. I would like ass to that planning issues in general because this act cost cities more to prepare lands for credential development. One of the major characters of the Urban Sprawl is low density, it also represents the American dream of owning a single-family house in the suburbs that include a backyard, and a car garage most of the time. Most of the sprawls are located out of the city boundary, which is an area that is unauthorized, and unplanned areas which is costing cities a lot in the …show more content…
First, military persons who trained at Davis-Monthan returned back to Tucson after the war to settle. Second, the affordable residential air conditioning made it easy to live in hot weather climate for many people. Third, automobile owning for middle class seek for single-family houses in large lots which was available in Tucson. In 1960, the population of Tucson reached 22,000, and by 2000 the population of 486,699 made Tucson the 30th largest City in the US. In 1950s, the City began to stop the subdivisions that was outside City limits which at that time urban sprawl was a popular act to implement the American dream of single-family houses. In early 1960s, California investors showed interest in cheap land for “retirment community” which in that time 70 square mile of the City was covered, and later in 2000 it tripled to cover 227 square mile of the City. Moreover, real estate and tourism became major elements in local

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