Urbanization In The Gilded Age Essay

1361 Words 6 Pages
People are constantly on the move past and present, searching for something promising, more opportunities and a purpose. All of these fall into the category of migration, which is not a new phenomenon to us humans because throughout history, up until now, people were and are always moving from place to place which results in the changes in the population statistics. Some find migration as an opportunity to have a successful life, meanwhile for others, it is a challenging process. There were two eras in the American History that highlight this. They are the Gilded Age and the Roaring Twenties. The Gilded Age marked the economic climax of America, even though there was still poverty existing in the city and the rural areas. Many ideas and technology …show more content…
The U.S. History Preserved stated that urbanization is, “The mass movement of people from rural areas to move densely populated environs and the growth of cities is the response to this evolutionary change (“U.S. History Preserved”). This is correct because every time when an urbanization is born there comes a significant change to the community or country. This is what happened in the Gilded Age. The people living in the rural did not have what the city people had so they moved to the city. For example not advance farming technology. The positive effects of the urbanization were better education, technology, transportation, opportunities and an improved lifestyle (U.S. History Preserved). One major urbanization factor that caused the population shift was the demand for factory labors (From the Country Side to the City). America at this time was focusing on industrial development. The government was investing more heavily in the city than rural because it saw that urbanization will take America to the next level economically. On the contrary, the Roaring Twenties was the height of America’s prosperity in many manners such as fashion, public amusements, real wages, opportunities, products, etc (Zeitz). The article mentions, “Americans had more time and money to spend on new kids of public amusements like dance halls, movie theaters, fun parks, and baseball stadiums” …show more content…
Both of them had high crime rates, poverty, housing, health and overpopulation, etc. Gilded had high crime rates which made the community very distant (Carlisle 81). In other words, there was not a keen relationship presented among the people (Carlisle 81). At the same time America faced a major health threat that was Tuberculosis. Rodney P. Carlisle wrote, “Because most physicians believed that there was no cure for the disease, treatment centered on providing fresh air, rest and abundant food (Carlisle 239). Since the city was not a sanitary place to be it was easy to get flu, even though there was and advanced knowledge of medicine and health (“The Gilded Age”). Finish bout the roaring twenties negative

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