Rehabilitation In Prison Analysis

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Though crime has statistically dropped the increasing prison population and recidivism rates cause many to question whether the prison has become obsolete. In many ways, it has. The prison has become quite costly, has seemed to fail its purpose of rehabilitating offenders, and has an over-represented Indigenous population. However, through improving programs, looking into alternative options to prison such as restorative justice and community-based corrections, and re-examining sentencing legislation and policies there may be a way to improve prisons.
According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) “in the June quarter 2015, the average daily number of full-time prisoners in Australia was 35,949,” surpassing previous records for Australia
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In addition, sentencing guidelines throughout Australia focus pre-dominantly on deterrence and “protection of the community” with the idea of rehabilitation as a secondary goal (Sarre 2005, 166-167). However, this fails to address the issue of preventing an offender from re-offending once released. Instead of rehabilitating prisoners, prisons may set up prisoners to fail and re-offend once released. Upon release from prison many prisoners may face “problems of material security, problems of personal relationships, and problems of identity and psychological adjustment” (Ross 2005, 171). It is difficult for offenders to obtain jobs and they may have lost everything that they had prior to incarceration. Relationships with family members may become strained, resulting in the loss of a support system for prisoners once released. The mentality of prisoners may be affected as well. In order to adjust to prison life prisoners may go through psychological changes. According to Haney (2003) this may include “dependency on institutional structures, distrust and suspicion, social distancing, and adopting informal rules and standards of prisoner culture” (as quoted in Ross 2005, 172). As a result, prisoners may have a difficult time adjusting to life outside of prison. Life after prison is not the only problem. Being sentenced “… a …show more content…
Understanding that not every program will work for every type of offense and every offender is essential. Secondly, it is important to understand the benefits of different programs. For instance, according to Gehring (2003) “offenders who engage in education are more likely to gain the skills necessary to succeed in life outside prison such as social skills and problem and these increases the success of reintegration” (quoted in Bahn 2011, 263). Therefore, through improving the quality and accessibility of educational programs prisoners may reintegrate into communities better upon release. In addition to educational programs, Graffam, Shrinkfield, Lavelle & Hardcastle (2004) state that “employment not only creates financial securities for ex-offenders but also provides structure, routine, positive social networks, and enhanced self-esteem” (quoted in Bahn 2011, 263). The type of work available in prisons and the work programs available to prisoners upon release can reduce stressful factors that may lead to

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