The Black Plague Analysis

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The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries were cataclysmic times in Europe marked by a momentous amount of death and dissension. Europe faced The Black Plague, political problems and the Hundred Years war and the Ottoman War and finally crisis in the church. Each unique crisis required their own individual response such as setting up new laws, revolting, and turning away from the church. ADD MORE The Black Plague was brought on in Europe when merchant ships came from China. Along with their goods, these ships transported black rats and gerbils who were carrying fleas infested with the Plague. The Plague caused a shocking amount of deaths; twenty million Europeans died, which was one third of the European population at the time. The Plague began in Sicily, Italy then traveled to the north and to the west. The death toll varied in each city. In sienna over 50% of the population died. In Paris half of the population died. And in Venice 2/3rd of the population fell to the disease. A series of famines increased the death toll. During this time, even the wealthiest, all family members slept in the same room along with their animals. This overcrowding made it easier for the disease to spread. The last problem was the major lack of sanitation throughout the entirety of …show more content…
A big part of wars in this time period was “campaigning seasons.” This means that the war would have many secessions because they couldn’t fight during the winter and the Black Plague also caused many secessions. Secessions were reached through a series of “elaborate truces.” These truces could last for years at a time. Another important theme of war was the “combination of intense respect and honor and savage brutality.” The nobels, when captured, were treated with respect because of how wealthy and how much monetary value they have. They would hold a noble for ransom and make a big profit out of it, while damaging the other

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