Piaget's Theory Of Language Analysis

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Language, an organised means of combining words in order to communicate; Sternberg 1995 (Eysenck. M. W. 2005; 345). Language written, spoken or heard is a massive concept that is essential in society, to communicate, learn and interact with one another. A broad concept to cover as it come in multiple variations, different nationalities which in concept alone is complex. Different understandings and ways in which it is learnt. It’s learned through multiple outlets as well; home listening to family and friends communicate with one enough as a young child, social interactions from play groups through and then increase vocabulary and understand throughout the education system and further. However, can the written and spoken terms of language be …show more content…
P. K. et al 2011; 443-4). Piaget proposed that the essence of knowledge is activity; an infant interacting with objects and developing an understanding of their properties and purpose or an adolescent solving a problem through developing a hypothesis; either way the process of cognitive and learning development is through action whether it be physical like the infant or mental like the adolescent, emphasis on activity in learning was important in Piaget’s work as he believed that for children’s learning ability to develop, they must not only interact with objects, but also to interact and employ ideas (Smith. P. K et al 2011; 444). He developed a scale of when children develop an understanding of their world around them at what time; birth to a year they become aware of their natural reflexes through the teen years and into twenties whereby individuals are able to have educated insight to situations and through knowledge and observations are aware of how to conduct themselves (Smith. P. K et al 2011; 445). Piaget was a first in the Psychology field to point out that a child’s mind has different stages as to which they develop and understand themselves and their world around them; …show more content…
P. K et al 2011; 544). Like Piaget, he saw that children develop knowledge through activity however differed by focusing on the involvement of others with level or more knowledge in the learning process; a result of social interactions between child and like-wise growing community (Smith. P. K. et al 2011; 545). Having a greater emphasis of the use of language than that of Piaget, he put emphasis on the fact that this is must also be seen in cultural context (Smith. P. K et al 2011; 546). Learning is first achieved through cooperation with others in multiple social settings with peers, teachers, parents and any other individuals in the child’s immediate environment, then the culture representation of the child through art and language; play and songs (Smith. P. K. et al 2011; 547). Bruner (1915- ) took and applied the works of Vygotsky to educational settings. Intrigued by Vygotsky’s suggestion that society provides the tools to become a further advanced thinker.

Children solve practical tasks with the help of their speech, as well as their eyes and hands; Vygotsky 1978; 26 (Smith. P. K. et al 2011;

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