Piaget's Cognitive-Developmental Theory

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The first name of the interviewee is Yumi and she is 26 years old. Sakura is a 4 months old girl and Yumi is her mother. During this infancy period, it would usually last until the age of two and that’s when the baby the initial learning occurs. The parents’ behavior and the environment would have a huge impact on how the baby will be learning. Additionally, the baby would master various of basic skills such as crying and nursing. The reason why I selected this period of development is that it would be more interesting to learn about how a newborn baby would be able to learn new things without any previous experiences or knowledge. Also, I am curious about how fast for an infant to learn new things in comparison to adults. In this essay, the …show more content…
18). Cognitive development is the development of information processing, memory, language and much more. It includes perceptual expertise, dialect learning, and different parts of mental health in a human body. In Yumi’s response, she said that her child could remember how to turn on her iPhone by pressing the home button which is located at the bottom of the front screen. However, she would forget how to turn it on about two weeks later. This response is related to the information described in the textbook because Berk wrote that, “Using operant conditioning, researchers study infant memory by teaching 2-to 6-month-olds to move a mobile by kicking a foot tied to it with a long cord. Two-month-olds remember how to activate the mobile for 1 to 2 days after training, and 3-month-olds for one week” (2013, p. 163). In this case, both Yumi and Berk have a similar experience that a baby about four months old could only remember certain things for about a week. Additionally, the language development of a baby during the infancy period is just as important. Berk (2013) believes, “Recent theories view language development as resulting from interactions between inner capacities and environmental influences” (p. 181). In other words, Berk believes that the language development of an infant began when the baby could communicate with …show more content…
According to Berk (2013), “When we describe one person as cheerful and “upbeat,” another as active and energetic, and still others as calm, cautious, persistent, or prone to angry outbursts, we are referring to temperament – early appearing, stable individual differences in reactivity and self-regulation” (p. 190). In other words, temperament refers to an individual’s nature. In Yumi’s response, she described her child that Sakura is usually calm and does not cry that much at all. This response is related to the information described in the textbook because from what Yumi described, her child seemed to be similar to a term that was referred by Berk in the textbook which was called an “easy child”. Berk (2013) wrote, “The easy child quickly establishes regular routines in infancy, is generally cheerful, and adapts easily easily to new experiences” (p. 190). In other words, Sakura is an easy child. Also, attachment was also an important factor in social-emotional development. According to Berk (2013), “Attachment is the strong affectionate tie we have with special people in our lives that leads us to feel pleasure when we interact with them and to be comforted by their near in times of stress” (p. 195). In Yumi’s response, she described that Sakura is shy. She does not feel safe to interact with strangers when her mom is not close by. This response

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