Migration And Ethnicity

1805 Words 8 Pages
The most common and dangerous stereotype that Africa possesses, is that of tribal attitudes and actions. Often, people believe that Africans, above all other ethnic individuals, are unhealthily attached to the tenets of their tribe. One might even be supported in this thought when observing the way African migrants and diasporas act within their new environment. However, through this paper, I decided to explore how those of the African diaspora come to their identity. Due to the connection between migrants and those of the diaspora, in my analysis, I often combine the experiences of the two. Through an analysis of 15 different sources related to the topic of migration, diasporas, and transnationality, I argue that although these people through …show more content…
With those within the diaspora, identity becomes detached from a specific location and is reliant on ways they can manage sustain the connection through their own efforts. As a result of this identity-forming in more than one place, the idea of translocality or transnationality emerges. Author Clemens Grenier in his piece on translocality in Namibia, he defines the two terms and writes on why the two are so similar. According to his research “Transnationalism...refers to “the processes by which immigrants forge and sustain multi-stranded social relations that link their societies of origin and settlement.” The idea emerged out of the necessity to conceptualize social fields that increasingly crossed national borders and thereby challenged concepts of nationhood and citizenship.” with this definition of transnationalism he goes on to state that within Namibia’s southern Kunene Region below. Scholars this can be observed at the local level through patterns of urban-rural movement. He states “transnational families” [within this region] manage to take care of their emotional, material and spiritual needs across national borders.As transnational actors, they create networked spaces that are “composed of observable social relationships and transactions”(Greiner 2010). The meaning of this is within Namibia, one can see the phenomena of transnationality as it applies …show more content…
Author Lisa Akesson in her piece noted that migration policies often were structured around the belief that African migration followed a circular pattern in which people travel abroad to gain education and return to their homes of origin with the resources to help aid the development of their home country. However, it seems to be that rather than those originally from Africa it is those second-generation Africans of the diaspora who wish to return to “do something good” for their country(Akesson 2011). Author Rachel Reynolds 's article discussing the Igbo-diaspora highlights this as she notes that many second-generation Igbo’s raised with an idealized version of their home countries enter fields such as medicine and engineering with the intent of returning to their countries to bring about some change. However, among some authors cite that when individuals migrate abroad to pursue better opportunities in the field such as engineering and medicine. However, they often leave Africa in a “brain drain” with many of their own countries at a lost for highly educated professionals(Nnaemeka 2007). Though he believes this causing the underdevelopment of the continent, he believes the diaspora could have an important role in preventing. As with their return and investment in educating and partnerships with Africa can increase the success of the continent( Nnaemeka

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