Liesel Last Words Analysis

1064 Words 5 Pages
The last words of Liesel’s novel are: “I have hated the words and I have loved them, and I hope I have made them right.” (528). Words are an essential piece of Liesel’s life, which she shares both good and bad memories with and hopes to use for good, not evil. To exemplify this theme, Markus Zusak, the author, picks and apt setting: “She was a girl. In Nazi Germany. How fitting that she was discovering the power of words.” (147). This quote is significant as it connects the power of words to one of the greatest “word shakers” in history, Adolf Hitler. Hitler has a powerful effect over the setting of the novel because the book takes place in Nazi Germany. Furthermore, Liesel’s political opinions eventually collide with her ingenuity in using …show more content…
Rudy inquires about Liesel’s book thievery: “‘How does it feel, anyway?’ ‘How does what feel?’ ‘When you take one of those books?’ At that moment, she chose to keep still. If he wants an answer, he 'd have to come back, and he did. ‘Well?’ he asked, but again, it was the boy who replied, before Liesel could even open her mouth. ‘It feels good, doesn 't it? To steal something back.’” (482-483). To illustrate Liesel’s intentions behind book thievery, Rudy acknowledges that she is stealing the books back. This could be taken literally, referring to the burning of the books, or the more likely explanation is the author is telling the reader how Hitler knows that without words, his people have no way of resisting. Liesel is taking back the words because she wants to resist, and knows without them she cannot. Her coming to literacy enables her to defy. After acquiring an understanding of the words, Liesel then questions their morality: “The words. Why did they have to exist? Without them, there wouldn 't be any of this. Without words, the Führer was nothing. There would be no limping prisoners, no need for consolation or wordly tricks to make us feel better.” (521). In this quote Liesel expresses her hatred toward Hitler. Without the words she feels that all her problems would go away, and everything would be better. Nonetheless, Liesel eventually …show more content…
Liesel sees that words represent more than Hitler overpowering Germany: “When she came to write her story, she would wonder when the books and the words started to mean not just something, but everything.”(30). Death describes how Liesel would figure out that the words are more than just a singular power, but have power in every approach. As a result of Hitler’s propaganda, Liesel began to hate words because she felt they were evil. In contrast, Liesel notices that words are not exclusive to evil, and that when writing her book she can use words for good. Liesel’s book is not only an example words being used for good, but also an example of the power words hold: “The words were on their way, and when they arrived, she would hold them in her hands like the clouds, and she would wring them out like the rain.” (80). This simile is describing how Liesel can control the words in a supernatural manner. When she “wrings them out like the rain” she is exemplifying how powerful words really are. Eventually, Liesel uses the power of words to overcome

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