Examples Of Figurative Language In Night By Elie Wiesel

A Gateway to Death In Night, Elie Wiesel explains his sinister experience of the concentration camps and its ruthless captors. When Wiesel witnessed the deaths and tortures of his race, he became bitter and pessimistic. When he watched the Jews burn, starve, or beaten to death by the captors, Wiesel felt that God was no longer on the Jews’ side. He felt that all hope was lost and that his death was near. Wiesel expresses his emotion and experience through figurative language, such as the Jews’ lives, loss of faith, and empathy. Wiesel felt that his life was going to end because he saw many Jews die. His state-of-mind had changed after the death of his mother and little sister. Wiesel developed a negative aspect of his race and his own life …show more content…
“…the eternal and terrible Master of the Universe, chose to be silent.” Wiesel felt that God no longer acknowledged the Jews’ existence. His heartbroken words sound as if Wiesel is trying to degrade his own race. The deaths of the Jews had destroyed Wiesel’s faith and dignity. He also did not want to celebrate Yom Kippur with his father. Some of the tortured Jews questioned God’s existence because the captors executed each Jew in front of the other; they wanted to give up. Wiesel felt that his race was weak against the Nazis, and that God allowed the pain to continue. After surviving the concentration camps, Wiesel was unsure about his faith. He believes that God nor the world could hear the cries of the suffered Jews. When the Nazis eradicated many of the Jews, Wiesel showed a dark side of him (Wiesel …show more content…
His mental state, loss of faith, and apathetic nature showed independency among his survival. Wiesel was able to survive the Holocaust and lived to tell a memoir of his experience through emotional and dark viewpoints. In Night, Wiesel emphasizes the imagery and figurative language and imagery with strong details, such as “burning corpses” and “violent captors.” His details showed the readers how the Jews were battling against their survival and the Nazis tortures. He excluded God and the world because he felt that the Jews were suffering alone. Facing death at night was an open door for the innocent Jews and they did not deserve such torture (Wiesel 28,

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