Karl Marx's Failure Of Communism In Russia

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Modern day Russian president, “Czar Putin”, has made great strides in bringing Russia back to it’s former glory after the downfall of the Soviet Union and Soviet communism threatened Russia’s position in the world as an international superpower. Prior to its modern day replication of the United States’s representative democracy, Russia’s system of government transitioned through two stages. As the totalitarian dictatorship of the Czarist period evolved into the socialist republic of the Soviet era, the world observed the Soviet Union’s attempts at implementing Karl Marx’s vision of communism in Russian society. Although Soviet leaders deemed that Russia had adopted a successful Communist system, Russian society under the USSR failed to emulate …show more content…
Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto set a base for Marxist ideology; however, flaws within the ideology itself prevented the implementation of a Communist state from being a realistic goal because among many other factors, Marx overestimated the willingness of individuals to put community needs above their own self-interests. Marx’s theory of Communism appears quite logical on the surface, granted that his assumptions of mankind hold true. The philosophy of Marxism has formed on the basis that men should work “for the benefit” of society, with that acting as their primary motive in life. The foundation for Communism itself quickly crumbles under the falsity of this belief. Marx’s idealist view on human nature simply discounts the truth that men created social divisions in society out of self-interest, an impulse evolved from the core instinct of survival. Historically, the constituents of a community have never proven to function without creating social divisions among themselves. While Marx emphasized the idea of parity among all members of a classless society, the presence of social classes continued in Soviet Russia. Essentially defined as the Community Party and …show more content…
Although Marx’s idea of a Communist state appeared as a functional economic system that could replace the Russia’s oppressive autocratic governments of Czarist times, Soviet leaders failed to abide by the guidelines Marx had set for the development of a Communist state. One such requisite of Marxist ideology dictated that Communism must take place in an industrialized society. Contrarily, when Vladamir Lenin came to rule in 1917, Russia was ruled under an agrarian society that simply could not support the lives of the middle class. Russian conflict with its surrounding countries presented itself as yet another untimely factor that prevented the Soviet Communism from emerging as gracefully as Marx had envisioned. Amidst the development of the Communist regime, Russia became involved in international affairs, namely World War II, the space race, and the arms race. While concentrating their efforts on dealing with these external affairs, the Soviets failed to direct enough attention into ensuring that Russia transcend into Communism following the guidelines set by Marx. Furthermore, Marx envisioned such a Communist society to function free of crime and vice, yet the head of the

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