The Romanov Family

1412 Words 6 Pages
The 20th century was a period of rapid change in regards to politics, technology, and societal norms. The fluctuations that manifested themselves were especially apparent in Russia. For much of the century, the name Russia was obsolete; in its place, the communist Soviet Union took root. Prior to the communist takeover, Russia was under the control of the Romanov dynasty. This particular family was in power for nearly three centuries. However, as time pressed onward, the bloodline and ruling capabilities grew weak and were unable to withstand the ongoing problems that occurred in Russia. The curious and calamitous end of the Romanov family was caused by a myriad of reasons including political instability, corruption, and economic issues. …show more content…
In light of this revelation, the local government was directed to prevent the potential for a rescue mission (Keep, John L.H.). The family was ushered to a dimly lit room within their prison. When guards entered the cell, one of them read a dictum, condemning the Romanovs to their death. While the deaths should have been quick, simple, and painless, the assassins truly mismanaged their assignment. Guns, bayonets, and stabbing were all vehicles of violence that were utilized to kill the royal family (Brennan, Zoey). Once each of the prisoners was killed, the bodies were cremated, thrown into an vacant mine, and then buried speedily elsewhere (Keep, John L.H.). Vladimir Lenin, the leader of the Bolsheviks, understood that the death of the Romanovs could engage the wrath of the Kaiser, due to Tsarina Alexandra’s connection with Germany; because of this, he initially chose to keep the information about their deaths quiet. His policy continued throughout history. In 1976, Russian scientists discovered the bodies, but did not reveal the breakthrough until the fall of the Soviet Union (Keep, John L. H.). In 1994, DNA testing revealed that the bodies that were found were those of Tsar Nicholas, Tsarina Alexandra, three of their daughters, and four of the servants that were with them. The fate Alexei, the former heir of the Romanov dynasty, and the unknown sister …show more content…
Revolutionaries such as Vladimir Lenin were able to take advantage of the corruption in the monarchy and instituted a coup d’etat (History.com Staff). The consequent, communist government in Russia was known as the Soviet Union. The harsh reality of what was happening behind the Iron Curtain was discussed in a figurative sense in George Orwell’s novel, 1984. Throughout the plot, Winston, the protagonist, is able to recall a world that existed prior to the oppressive government that he knows. Eventually, Winston receives a book entitled The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism. In the volume, he learns of the previous class systems, countries that used to exist, and old-fashioned values. Unbeknownst to Winston, the information is supplied by the Inner Party, officials of Oceania that are granted special privileges by Big Brother (Orwell, George)1. Hence, it would make sense that it is critical of the past, much like Joseph Stalin and his supporters were very critical of the Romanov monarchs. The corruption and political instability that sparked the communist revolution in Russia in the 20th century occurs in many areas across the world. 1984 utilizes this history to tell cautionary tale that relates to the Soviet Union, but it also serves as a reminder of what could happen if a government gains absolute power over its people

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