Jeannette Rankin Women's Suffrage

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The fight for women’s suffrage was an ongoing topic in the United States in the 1920’s. Women’s suffrage was the struggle for women to achieve the right to vote and hold office, which was a pressing matter for women of the time. But it was soon to be that women 's lives would be changed for the better in politics, work, education, and in the home. With advances in society, some women stood up and made a true example of women’s suffrage activists and future congresswomen. Jeannette Rankin was one of those women who decided to take a stand for what she believed. She was the most influential woman of her time that made a positive impact on women 's suffrage rights and power for women in congress.
Women’s Suffrage had long materialized before Jeannette
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With Montana being her home state, she decided to take her stand there. When she spoke in front of the legislature, many were surprised at how well she spoke. After this, she lived in New York for a short time and worked for the National American Woman Suffrage Association, but then ended back up in Montana to help organize a campaign for women 's suffrage in the year of 1914. When World War Two occurred, she shifted her focus to working for peace. This then led her to run for a position in congress as a republican, which she won. Rankin being elected as the first women in the United States Congress, was a huge step for women’s rights. With her newfound power she pushed for peace and women 's rights. She supported measures to protect women workers by regulating their hours and pay, maternal and child health care, and efforts that would help stop prostitution near army camps, (“RANKIN, …show more content…
At this time WWI was approaching and before casting her vote on what to do about the war, she violated protocol and spoke while roll was being taken. She announced “I want to stand by my country, but I cannot vote for war.” Her vote against the war caused many to criticize the suffrage movement. When the US did get involved, she fought for the rights of women working in the war effort. After her first term, she was gerrymandered out of her seat and tried to run again but lost. After her defeat Rankin focused on her pacifist goals. She then became a delegate to the Women’s International Conference for Peace in Switzerland and later become an active and important member of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. At this same time she worked on the American Civil Liberties Union. She then moved from Montana to Georgia and returned to her legal residence every summer. During her time in Georgia, Rankin lobbied for many different organizations such as those to end child labor. Also in 1935, she was given an opportunity to be the Peace Chair at a college in Georgia but shortly after was accused of being a communist. Rankin spoke in 10 states and gave 93 different speeches before realizing that lobbying was not the most effective way to accomplish anything for her peace movement. Soon after this realization, she returned to politics and gained spot in the House of Representatives during 1939. Again

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