Women's Rights After Ww2

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Before World War II women were limited in their social, political and economic rights. Women were unable to earn a wage comparable to men. Women were also greatly limited in their career opportunities when compared to men. Due to expectations of getting married, child rearing, and taking care of the home, women did not have much representation outside of the domicile. The war changed American politics, economics and social rights for women. Women were utilized because of the shortage of men, in the workforce and as the new consumer demographic. However, once the war was over women were cast aside once more. The social change was driven by utility and not by heart. Women 's rights of this era was not driven by benevolence but because …show more content…
A war where factories, distribution centers, economic centers and more are sought out in bombing or shelling campaigns. A “Total War” can also be used to describe a war that requires a nation to commit a serious effort in it 's industry to support the war effort. Essentially a nation would utilize every resource it could to power it 's war effort, while not failing every chance to deprive their enemy of the same. Had the war not been so taxing on the nation 's resources it is likely women would not been able to have to chance to prove …show more content…
Women worked in what was called “pink collared” positions, secretaries, maids, nannies and generally lower paid positions than men. It was not long after the war started that women were signing up to join. Women were enlisting in formerly male dominated careers, such as office workers, instructors and other positions that were not on the front. “Women also joined the United States Navy. During the fall of 1942, the Women 's Auxiliary Air Squadron became known as the Women 's Air Force, began training women pilots who flew planes to various military bases in the United States”(Yale). The military was becoming hard pressed for pilots as they were suffering heavy losses. "As the supply of experienced male pilots began to dwindle, Nancy Love a woman pilot proposed the recruitment of the most qualified women pilots in the nation to assist the air transport command as civilian 's employees. Love 's proposal was adopted in the summer of 1942 and 25 female pilots were recruited to become members of the WAAF 's, with Nancy Love as commander. Each of the women had more than 1,000 hours of flying time and they quickly proved capable of the kind of duties for which they had been

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