Jean Piaget Theory Of Cognitive Development

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Jean Piaget was a theorist who believed children progressed through stages of cognitive development. He believed children learned in an organizing way and as they grow they reach new levels. Based on his study and observing his own children he believed infants from birth to the age of 2 obtained knowledge at the sensorimotor stage. Have you ever played a game of peek-a-boo with an infant and was amazed when they were able to mimic your actions? Or have you clapped your hands and watched with excitement as the infant mirrored your same actions? From birth to 2 children acquire knowledge through sensory skills and motor activity. Piaget theory believed infants come into this world with little sense of sensory and motor skills, he believed the mind form through an organized process. The first stage of the process is the adaption. Infants come into the world with some knowledge and they take the information already known and build on it with new …show more content…
As infants and toddlers develop cognitively they also start developing social skills. Through their relationships with their caregiver they learn how to show emotion. When infants and toddlers experience trusting relationships and secure feeling of love they tend to have better social connections with others outside their immediate environment. A child that is not nurtured usually will have mistrust and more than likely will not have positive interactions with others. Infants and toddlers need constant interactions with others. As infants and toddlers grow they will have emotional attachments. Emotional attachment is needed in order for the basic needs of the child to be met. A child that does not receive the necessary emotional support will be deprived of social skills and may feel the need to reach out for love in

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