Is Junk Food Rhetorical Analysis

1525 Words 7 Pages
Mark Bittman argues that junk food can be just as expensive if not more expensive then good food. His argument is presented to his readers in “Is Junk Food Really Cheaper” an essay written by Bittman. Bittman tries to convince his audience by connecting the issues with his readers. He then provides his readers with a logical and reasonable argument that makes them re-think if junk food really is cheaper or easier. Bittman confirms his argument by using statements from other creditable sources Bittman’s argument sends a good and convincing message because it lets people know that the concept “junk food is easier and cheaper” is not always the case. With obesity on a rise its important that people know there is healthier options for less money. …show more content…
Logos is an author’s way of persuading their audience by using logic, and reasoning. Readers are more likely to agree with an author’s argument if they believe the author provides a logical explanation for their argument. Bittman makes several statements that capture the reader’s attention and gives them something to consider. In attempt to shut down the excuses that junk food is easier and faster than cooking Bittman says “if you can drive to McDonald’s you can drive to Safeway” (Bittman 661). This statement gets his readers thinking and puts a stop their arguments as well as making them feel guilt. Another way Bittman displays logos in his essay is when he states, “The alternative to soda is water, and the alternative to junk food is not grass-fed beef and greens from a trendy farmers’ market, but anything other than junk food” (pg. 661). Bittman suggests that “rice, grains, pasta, beans, fresh vegetables, canned vegetables, frozen vegetables, meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, bread, peanut butter” (pg. 661) would be a healthier alternative to junk food. These alternatives provide his readers with healthier options to eat that won’t break the …show more content…
Ethos is used to confirm the credibility of a writer so that they seem more trustworthy to the audience. Bittman uses sources such as, Julie Guthman, Scripps Research Institute, David A. Kessler, and Malik Yakini to validate himself as well has his argument. After giving their name Bittman then writes a short statement about their credentials. For example, Bittman writes, “For 50 years, says David A. Kessler, former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration and author of “The End of Overeating,” companies strove to create food that was “energy-dense, highly stimulating, and went down easy” (pg. 663). This reinforces his argument because it gives his readers an idea of why this outside source should be trusted, therefore why he should be trusted A great example of this is when Bittman states “a thousand other things cooked at home — in almost every case a far superior alternative” (Bittman 661). Now is where Bittman backs up his statement with a stamen from another source and follows with their credentials, ““Anything that you do that’s not fast food is terrific; cooking once a week is far better than not cooking at all,” says Marion Nestle, professor of food studies at New York University and author of “What to Eat.”” (Bittman 661). The audience now knows that Bittman argument is backed up by credible research and people, thus making his argument more convincing. The reader knows he is a credible writer with a convincing argument, they also

Related Documents