In Defense Of Distraction

Improved Essays
Authors Anderson, Goldberger, and Franzen address the audience about concerns within societies and the effect technology has disconnected the reality and everyday social lives of one another and how these distractions have invaded our privacy and the idea of it. They accomplish this argument by using sources with a variety of experts and interviews that give expertise to persuade the argument of technology and the distractions it creates among society’s ultimate connections and ideas of privacy. In this way Anderson, Goldberger, and Franzen convince the audience of the ultimate distraction technology creates in the attention society seems to diminish and invade the privacy we once had.
In the essay “In Defense of Distraction” in Writing Analytically
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For example, when interviewing Merlin Mann, Anderson mentions the way the atmosphere was when he approached Mann by stating, “When I call Merlin Man, one of life hacking’s early adopters and breakout stars, he is running late, rushing back to his office, and yet he seems somehow to have attention to spare….He talks in the snappy aphorisms of a professional speaker…and always breaking ideas down into their atomic parts and reassessing the way they fit together: “What does it come down to? ”So why am I telling you this, and what does it have to do with life hacks” (510). In doing so, it allows the audience to analyze the argument and sources provided and give the audience the ability to engage in the argument and give a perception of the situation. Therefore Anderson's essay of distraction and how that has eliminated the connections we once had within ourselves in society, relates to the essay of Paul Goldberger and Jonathan Franzen in a way that the argument these authors are persuading is the idea of connection that has vanished within ourselves. Goldberger gives examples of a public place and the urban experience one creates when interacting with this public idea and how it has changed throughout time, making it the ultimate place diminished. He uses real life events and daily life routines to make the reader connect towards his article and further on to his argument. Franzen uses his examples to demonstrate that privacy is the essence of modern American, and though some may justify the idea of privacy others sacrifice privacy for

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